Day: June 27, 2020

Edited Transcript of LEHN.S earnings conference call or presentation 19-May-20 8:00am GMT

Plan-les-Ouates Jun 27, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of Lem Holding SA earnings conference call or presentation Tuesday, May 19, 2020 at 8:00:00am GMT

* Marc E. Possa

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the full year results 2019/’20 conference call and live webcast. I am Shai, the Chorus Call operator. (Operator Instructions) The conference is being recorded. (Operator Instructions) The conference must not be recorded for publication or broadcast.

At this time, it’s my pleasure to hand over to Frank Rehfeld, CEO of LEM Holding. Please go ahead.

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for joining us on this webcast where we would like to review with you the full year results presentation of our financial year ’19/’20. My name is Frank Rehfeld. I’m the CEO of LEM. And I’m together here with Andrea Borla, our CFO; and Andreas Hürlimann, the Chairman of our Board.

For those who … Read More

So long to the city! How lockdown created a wave of ‘panic movers’

Chantel Elshout, 39, and her husband, Michael Craig, 45, are moving from Clapham to the Cotswolds - Paul Grover for the Telegraph/ Paul Grover
Chantel Elshout, 39, and her husband, Michael Craig, 45, are moving from Clapham to the Cotswolds – Paul Grover for the Telegraph/ Paul Grover

Cast your mind back to February, just four months, yet another lifetime ago, and Emily Harvey was a committed urbanite. Her PR job meant she enjoyed long lunches in the latest London restaurants, while weekends were spent at hot yoga classes, pop-up farmers’ markets and museums with her five-year-old daughter, Alice. 

Lockdown obviously put paid to all that, but just as it eases, she and her family are fleeing the capital for good.

“We took a rental in the Cotswolds during lockdown and when we returned after 12 weeks, London was like a scene from [the horror film] 28 Days Later, with everyone in masks,” she says. “After a blissful time spent in the countryside we realised we didn’t want to be in a cramped,

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Money Inc: Looking for Deals

Click here to read the full article.

When coronavirus first hit, beauty investors sheltered in place and routed efforts toward their existing portfolio companies to make sure that those brands could weather the storm. But now that reopening has begun and private equity executives are emerging into a changed world—one that has undergone several months of a pandemic and the global swell of the Black Lives Matter movement—their perspectives on beauty deals have, at least somewhat, been altered.

The fundamentals remain the same: Investors want growing businesses in attractive categories with good management teams and solid brand DNA. But other aspects—like profitability and a strong direct-to-consumer connection—have taken on even more importance, sources said. Diversity, too, has become a priority for leaders as they assemble boards and pick the companies they invest in, with several sources saying they will consciously work to invest in black-owned businesses and hire black executives

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Accenture is laying people off as Wall Street braces for big cuts next year

 

Welcome to Wall Street Insider, where we take you behind the scenes of the finance team’s biggest scoops and deep dives from the past week. 

If you aren’t yet a subscriber to Wall Street Insider, you can sign up here.

Accenture is cutting US staff, and top execs just warned of more pain to come as the consulting giant promotes fewer people and looks to control costs, Meghan Morris and Dakin Campbell first reported. Their story got a lot of attention this week, and for good reason. It could be an indicator for how the firm’s own clients are weathering a downturn, and consulting likely won’t be the only industry to feel the crunch.

We also took a look at who’s most at risk once Wall Street kicks off the tidal wave of layoffs many banks had put on pause — and why boutique firms without a strong restructuring practice

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JoJo Siwa responds to accusations of blackface in music video

JoJo Siwa is setting the record straight regarding accusations that she featured a dancer wearing blackface in her new music video for her song “Nonstop.”

The 17-year-old “Boomerang” singer and former “Dance Moms” star posted a message on Instagram Friday explaining that the dancer in question was dressed up as a circus animal to go along with the video’s big top theme and wasn’t wearing blackface.

“I need to set the record straight about a few things because some have been irresponsible in recent stories and posts about me, and everyone seems to rush to conclusions without having all of the facts,” Siwa posted.

The big bow-wearing star, known for her appearances on YouTube and hosting kid-friendly shows on Nickelodeon, said she experienced backlash from haters that devolved into criticism of her appearance and sexuality over a costume that was in not intended to depict race.

“My instagram post yesterday

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7 ways cybercrime is evolving amid the coronavirus pandemic

For many cybercriminals, the global coronavirus pandemic has been a golden opportunity for fraud.

And we haven’t even seen the worst of it yet.

Scammers love crises. From the criminal’s perspective, few things are better for cultivating new victims than a natural disaster or a social crisis.

Why? Because scams work best when people aren’t thinking clearly. When people are highly emotional, scared or anxious, as they usually are during a crisis, they tend to make impulsive decisions. This is exactly what the scammers want.

Read more: What to do if your identity has been stolen

A woman uses a smartphone and a mobilephone in front of a laptop on April 3, 2019. (Photo by ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images)

Cybercriminals are opportunists, and during a “normal” crisis — like a natural disaster — the opportunities are often short-lived. But the current crisis (or, rather, crises) is different.

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Puppy scams thrive amid coronavirus pandemic as Americans seek company: Illegal Tender podcast

This is part 1 of Yahoo Finance’s Illegal Tender podcast Season 6 ‘The Puppy Crimes of Quarantine’. Listen to the series here. 

In the early days and weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans acted on equal parts fear and necessity converting their homes into offices, gyms, and schools.

Those who were healthy found themselves restless and in search of a distraction. People painted rooms different colors and baked banana bread, and some saw an opportune time to get a puppy. 

Would-be dog parents took to the internet in droves searching for new dogs to adopt. Pandemic puppies were such hot commodities that reports of possible shortages of adoptable dogs first made headlines in late March.

Online dog scammers, which typically work during the winter holidays, came out in full force to exploit the pandemic. With stolen images or stock photos, they create online profiles of dogs, communicate with potential adopters, … Read More

A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting Started

Making money by doing what you love might not be as complicated as you think.

If you have a book, movie, comic, podcast, class, craft or any other creative project you want to share with the world, you can put it up for sale in about five minutes with Gumroad, an online platform that lets artists, writers and other makers sell their projects.

However, before you dive into Gumroad, know that creating a product is one thing, but actually making sales takes time, effort and know-how.

How to Use Gumroad

This guide will lay out the steps you’ll need to follow to start making money with Gumroad.

1. Make Something

Gumroad is a marketplace it’s only worth using if you have something to sell.

There’s no reason to let that discourage you, though! A wide range of products are on offer on Gumroad, including movies, books, music and courses.

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Inside One Mother’s Fight To Help Her Kids Get An Education During Coronavirus

(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)
(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)

This story about rural education was produced as part of the series Critical Condition: The Students the Pandemic Hit Hardest, reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience. She had been sitting in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Greenville, Mississippi, for more than an hour, so her oldest child, Kentiona, could connect to the building’s Wi-Fi, something they didn’t have at home. Johnson didn’t want her daughter to feel rushed. 

Kentiona, 16, was in the passenger seat using the car’s dashboard as a makeshift desk. Her high school had recently closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and shifted to distance learning. Kentiona’s persuasive essay for her English class had brought them to the McDonald’s on that third Friday

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When Is Tax-Free Shopping Happening in Your State?

Click here to read the full article.

Believe it or not, back-to-school season is quickly approaching. While it’s most likely going to look a lot different this year, especially if you’ll be continuing remote learning, there are some things that are here to stay. One of those things you’ve been wondering about? Tax-free shopping. The good news: It’s happening, but it looks different in every state. According to the Federation of Tax Administrators, 16 states are participating this year. In addition, Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, and Oregon never charge sales tax. So, if you live in these states, maybe you can shop for the rest of us year round?

Tax-free holidays generally start toward the end of July and go through August and range from a couple days to about a week. You can expect to save on clothing, shoes, school supplies, and even big-ticket items like a computer

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