Day: June 28, 2020

The Independent’s Happy List 2020: Heroes in a crisis

Today The Independent publishes its annual Happy List, which this year honours 50 remarkable heroes in a crisis who have helped others during the Covid-19 pandemic. These are some of Britain’s most inspirational individuals, whose kindness, ingenuity and dedication prove that the worst of times can bring out our best.

The 50 people here have been chosen by a panel from scores of nominations from you, the readers of The Independent. We received so many examples of people doing extraordinary things without thought of personal gain, and acts of kindness uniting communities. A huge thank you to everyone who played a part.

The Happy List, in partnership with GoFundMe, the world’s largest online fundraising platform, is completely unranked. Instead, it appears in alphabetical order, as it would be impossible to measure the successes of these individuals against each other. They include a six-year old boy with spina bifida who

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Jack Ma’s New Chieftain Lays Out His Plan to Fend Off Tencent

(Bloomberg) —

Billionaire Jack Ma’s newest chieftain is accelerating Alipay’s evolution into an online mall for everything from loans and travel services to food delivery, in a bid to claw back shoppers lost to Tencent Holdings Ltd.

Ant Group Chief Executive Simon Hu is aggressively pitching digital payment and cloud offerings to the local arms of KFC Holding Co. and Marriott International Inc., expanding the firm’s focus from banks and fund managers on its ubiquitous app.

The Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. affiliate’s strategy is two-pronged. It halts Tencent and food delivery giant Meituan Dianping’s run-away success in attracting local merchants to their platforms, eroding Ant’s dominance of China’s $29 trillion mobile payments space. It also diversifies Ant’s business into less-sensitive areas after the firm drew regulatory scrutiny for its blistering expansion in financial services with in-house products.

“We want to help digitize the services industry,” said Hu in his first

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Starbucks suspends advertising on all social media platforms, becoming the latest company to boycott Facebook

A Starbucks store sign is shown during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Valparaiso
A Starbucks store sign is shown during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Valparaiso

Reuters

  • Starbucks announced Sunday it will suspend all of its advertising across social media platforms as it conducts discussions “internally, with our media partners, and with civil rights organizations” about ending the spread of hate speech.

  • Facebook, in particular, has taken criticism for its response to hate speech on its platform and its decision to allow President Trump to make controversial posts, such as calling protesters “thugs” and writing “when the looting starts, the shooting starts.”

  • Starbucks joins Coca Cola in announcing an outright suspension on all social media advertising, while other companies have announced temporary bans on Facebook ads.

  • While the company is suspending its social media ads, it is not joining the #StopHateForProfit campaign bolstering the Facebook advertising boycott, according to CNBC.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Starbucks on Sunday announced it

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Starbucks suspends social media ads over hate speech

Starbucks has announced it will suspend advertising on some social media platforms in response to hate speech.

The coffee giant joins global brands including Coca-Cola, Diageo and Unilever which have recently removed advertising from social platforms.

A Starbucks spokesperson told the BBC the social media “pause” would not include YouTube, owned by Google.

“We believe in bringing communities together, both in person and online,” Starbucks said in a statement.

The brand said it would “have discussions internally and with media partners and civil rights organizations to stop the spread of hate speech”. But it will continue to post on social media without paid promotion, it said.

The announcement came after Coca-Cola called for “greater accountability” from social media firms.

Coca Cola said it would pause advertising on all social media platforms globally, while Unilever, owner of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, said it would halt Twitter, Facebook and Instagram advertising

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Starbucks latest to say it will pause social media ads

Starbucks is the latest company to say it will pause social media ads after a campaign led by civil rights organizations called for an ad boycott of Facebook, saying it doesn’t do enough to stop racist and violent content.

Starbucks said Sunday that its actions were not part of the “#StopHateforProfit” campaign, but that it is pausing its social ads while talking with civil rights organizations and its media partners about how to stop hate speech online.

The coffee chain’s announcement follows statements from Unilever, the European consumer-goods giant behind Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and Dove soap; Coca-Cola; cellphone company Verizon and outdoors companies like Patagonia, Eddie Bauer and REI; film company Magnolia Pictures; jeans maker Levi’s and dozens of smaller companies. Some of the companies will pause ads just on Facebook, while others will refrain from advertising more broadly on social media.

In response to companies halting advertising,

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Salesforce CEO urges public schools to build ‘resiliency,’ distance learning as coronavirus rages

Marc Benioff sees an opportunity to build resiliency in the public education system, as the raging coronavirus pandemic calls into question whether schools can reopen in the fall.

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in mass school closures, with teachers and students relying heavily on remote learning.

Benioff, the billionaire tech chief and founder of enterprise software giant Salesforce (CRM) is a big supporter of public schools. He told Yahoo Finance in an interview that officials need to be prepared for the fall — especially if a dreaded second COVID wave swamps the U.S., which is faltering in its efforts to contain the first.

“I think we’ve got more issues coming. And we better be ready and build that resiliency now into our public education system,” Benioff said. 

The 55-year-old CEO who has an estimated net worth of $7.6 billion is a significant benefactor of public schoolhouses. Since Benioff made an impromptu

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‘We All Deserve to Have Our Voices Heard’

Michelle Obama wants people to get out and vote in November.

Through her nonprofit organization When We All Vote, Mrs. Obama teamed up with The Roots during the 13th Annual Roots Picnic on Saturday to encourage people to register to vote for the upcoming 2020 presidential election.

During the virtual event, the former first lady, 56, shared a passionate plea about voter registration.

“These past few months have been pretty heavy for just about everyone and the truth is, we still got our work cut out for us in the weeks and months ahead,” she said. “I want to remind everybody that we got an election coming up and it couldn’t be more important that everybody makes their voice heard this time around.”

“If you aren’t sure where to get started you can take the first step by making sure you are registered to vote,” the mother of two said,

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‘Dungeons & Dragons’ Race Issues Have Deep Roots In The World Of Fantasy

Wizards of the Coast — the company behind the self-proclaimed “world’s greatest role-playing game,” “Dungeons & Dragons” — has committed to stressing diversity and removing racially problematic language from its product line, and fans are holding the company to account for its promises.

“Dungeons & Dragons,” commonly known as D&D, is a game in which a group of players creates characters, rolls dice and navigates a story overseen by a Dungeon Master. Originally created in 1974, the game issued a fifth edition in 2014 that became its most popular, especially after livestreaming platforms such as Twitch and shows such as Netflix’s “Stranger Things” introduced D&D to new audiences.

The game’s newfound popularity, however, has also invited critiques. Critics have pointed out that when creating a character, D&D players must choose a “race” — such as an elf, dwarf or gnome — and that this usage of the word is technically

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9 Questions to Be Ready to Answer in a Remote Job Interview

Remote work has been on the rise for years, but the COVID-19 pandemic has finally shoved it into the limelight.

Being forced to send workers home to slow the spread of the disease throughout 2020 and into 2021 will likely cause many employers to rethink their positions on remote work and open up more work-from-home positions.

“A lot of people have been transitioning into working remotely solely because they have the option to work while traveling, or while trying to be safe from the virus,” said Carolyn Cairns, marketing manager at Dubai- and UAE-based business setup firm Creation Business Consultants.

Employers across all industries, whether they’re new to managing remote workforces or have long been remote operations, want to know how employees will handle working from home.

So if you’re applying for a work-from-home position, be prepared to answer these remote job interview questions.

9 Questions You Might Have to

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The ‘domestic terrorist’ designation won’t stop extremism

<span class="caption">When blocking a highway, who is a domestic terrorist and who is a peaceful protester? And does it make a legal difference?</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/protesters-block-interstate-5-after-marching-from-the-area-news-photo/1222748902" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:David Ryder/Getty Images">David Ryder/Getty Images</a></span>
When blocking a highway, who is a domestic terrorist and who is a peaceful protester? And does it make a legal difference? David Ryder/Getty Images

As U.S. politics heat up in advance of the November election, it’s not surprising that extremist groups across the political spectrum are becoming more active and engaged in acts of political violence.

A growing number of scholars and policymakers suggest this problem should be dealt with by designating violent groups as “domestic terrorist” organizations.

Like most students of American extremism, I agree that some members of domestic extremist groups do engage in terrorist acts – using violence to spread fear among targeted groups of people, with the aim of promoting political objectives. Nonetheless, as someone who has studied democracies’ response to domestic terrorism for almost 20 years, I believe that legally designating domestic extremist groups as terrorist organizations will have limited benefits, if any at

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