Day: June 29, 2020

Best Buy and Sell Apps for Used Stuff

Turn unwanted items into cash and buy used.

When you’re living paycheck to paycheck, you are likely feeling burned out and stressed out. And no matter how much you cut back on certain expenses and purchases, it may not be enough to break the cycle. Sometimes you just need that extra boost to get ahead.

Although taking on a second job or side hustle may seem like the only way to make some extra money, don’t overlook the opportunity to turn unwanted items into cash. Whether it’s an old gadget, unworn clothing or a closet full of toys collecting dust, spending time selling the items you no longer need or use can help you earn that much-needed money. To get you started, here are 13 free apps and sites that make selling and buying items in person or online a cinch.

letgo

Whether you want to sell an old smartphone,

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Tech employees are selling referrals online to job candidates for under $50 to help them get hired at Google, Facebook, and other industry giants

Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO's "Silicon Valley" TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.
Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.

Warner Bros/IMDb

  • A website is allowing prospective tech employees to anonymously purchase a job referral from existing tech workers for $20 to $50 apiece.

  • Rooftop Slushie, created by the makers of techie chat favorite Blind, has hosted 11,000 referral transactions since it was launched in 2019. Facebook and Google referrals are the most popular.

  • The “vendors” are established employees at companies like Amazon, Google, and Twitter who can become verified on the website and vet candidate submissions before accepting the deal.

  • The site’s product manager told One Zero that the service helps improve a skilled candidate’s chances of getting hired, but critics say paying for and accepting payment for a job referral is unethical.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The hiring process in the tech

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WHO issues ‘worst is yet to come’ warning; Jacksonville, the host of GOP convention, mandating masks

As coronavirus cases climbed in the U.S. and across the globe, the World Health Organization director general warned “the worst is yet to come.” 

Adjustments were being made to help slow spreading of the disease. The city scheduled to host the GOP convention is mandating masks. It’s not clear how long the order issued by Jacksonville, Florida, will remain in place. The Republican convention is scheduled for Aug. 24-27 at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena. Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Some good news? The nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Here are the most significant developments of the day:

  • Worldwide coronavirus cases surpassed 10 million, while more than 502,000

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Billions of dollars in aid for small businesses go unclaimed

NEW YORK (AP) — Billions of dollars offered by Congress as a lifeline to small businesses struggling to survive the pandemic are about to be left on the table when a key government program stops accepting applications for loans.

Business owners and advocacy groups complain that the money in the Paycheck Protection Program was not fully put to work because the program created obstacles that stopped countless small businesses from applying. For those that did seek loans, the ever-changing application process proved to be an exercise in futility.

“It was a flawed structure to begin with,” said John Arensmeyer, CEO of Small Business Majority, an advocacy group. “It favored established businesses. It was set up to give money to people with strong banking relationships.”

The program’s shortcomings also made it more difficult for minority businesses to get loans, according to a report from the Center for Responsible Lending, a research

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Guy Fieri Says He Doesn’t *Actually* Live Off Of Fried Cheeseburgers And Corndogs

Photo credit: NBC - Getty Images
Photo credit: NBC – Getty Images

From Delish

If you’re a fan of Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives (and let’s be real, we all are!) you might already know that Guy Fieri has a dream job. He gets to travel the country finding the best food—much of which is fried and covered in cheese—and talk to the amazing people who make it all. But it might surprise you to know that Guy doesn’t always eat like that. In a recent interview, the chef and host shared his favorite grub to eat…and his favorite part about filming Triple D.

Guy recently told CBS News that though people think he solely eats foods like “fried cheeseburger, hotdog, corndog, pretzels covered in cheese” he actually mostly lives on healthier fare like veggies and farro and was influenced by his “hippie” upbringing.

“Veggies are my game. Love salad. Love spaghetti squash. Love all the whole

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Inside Deciem’s Virtual Consultations

Click here to read the full article.

As the manager of Deciem’s New York City Fifth Avenue, one of the perks of Anthony Clemetson’s job is meeting people from all over the world. Now, though, with the coronavirus pandemic forcing stores to close their brick-and-mortar outposts, Clemetson speaks with people worldwide as part of the brand’s virtual consultation team. Using software from Hero, Clemetson focuses on client education and outreach. Now, though, while the medium may be different, the message remains the same. “What drew me to Deciem was seeing how they do retail,” Clemetson says. “Customer kindness and education over sales is key.”

 

How do clients schedule virtual consultations?

On the Deciem web site, there’s a small pop-up on the bottom right corner. It builds on their at-home experience.

What is your philosophy on making a sale?

 We’re lucky that we’re not a sales-driven company. Did I educate the

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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‘Do we still want to move?’ Homebuyers rush back in droves despite pandemic

Dr. Rishi Manchanda toured empty homes in Los Angeles, California. By appointment only. In gloves and masks, and six feet from the real estate agent. But even in a pandemic, Manchanda and his family were still ready to buy a home.

“Nobody knew what was coming and the housing experts we talked to were uncertain about the market,” Manchanda said. “So, it came down to a simple question: ‘Do we still want to move?’”

Read more: Coronavirus: Here’s what to do if you can’t pay your mortgage

For Manchanda and many other buyers, the answer remains yes. He’s part of the wave of homebuyers who are flooding the market after the coronavirus and state lockdowns halted the economy in April, interrupting the busiest home-buying season of the year.

Now they’re back — in spite of outbreaks and an unsteady economy — and they face old and new foes: a persistent

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Jacksonville, the host of GOP convention, mandating masks; Broadway closed until 2021;

The city scheduled to host the GOP convention is mandating masks and Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases. However, the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Jacksonville, Florida, on Monday joined the growing ranks of cities requiring face coverings to help curb spread of the virus. It’s not clear how long the order will remain in place. The Republican convention is scheduled for Aug. 24-27 at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena in Jacksonville and President Donald Trump has famously refused to wear a mask in public.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for 

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Setting Money Goals at Milestone Birthdays, and Bagging Big Bucks with Bank Bonuses

Welcome to NerdWallet’s SmartMoney podcast, where we answer your real-world money questions.

This week’s episode starts with a discussion about “big birthdays.” A milestone birthday can start you thinking about what you’ve done with your life and where you want to go in the future. Setting new money goals may help you achieve some of those dreams.

Then we pivot to this week’s question from Austin, who says: “I keep seeing advertisements for sign-up bonuses when you join a new bank. And I’m wondering if they’re actually legit. Can I really get a couple hundred bucks for ‘free’ by making a new bank account?”

Some banks will give you money — often $200 or even more — to entice you to open a bank account. You will have to jump through some hoops, though. For checking accounts, you’ll typically need to set up direct deposit of a certain amount, such … Read More