Day: July 2, 2020

A List Of Mental Health Resources Available For People Of Color

This month is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and right now, access to mental health care for people of color is especially critical. Black people have been watching as a disproportionate number of their loved ones die from the coronavirus pandemic. They’ve watched people who look like them be violently killed or threatened — for nothing more than being Black in public.

Finding a psychologist or mental health worker is difficult for many people. Your health insurance may not cover it. There may be no counselors near you. And Black people face another challenge: In the United States, just 5.3% of psychologists are Black; 83.6% are white. That means that if you’re a person of color searching for a therapist or any other kind of mental health resource, it might be difficult to connect with someone who looks like you.

That’s a problem, since having a therapist of the

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A bathroom-break bill? California looks to make sure warehouse workers can take a break

OAKLAND, Calif.— A new California bill aims to change working conditions for warehouse workers who have come under increased productivity pressure from major retailers that track their every move.

The bill, AB3056, aims to ensure that workers are not penalized for time spent on personal hygiene such as hand washing or using the restroom. Many workers say that automated monitoring systems warn management if they spend too much time “off task.”

The bill would apply to warehouse workers who work for Amazon, Walmart, Target and other large retailers across the state, which has the most warehouses of any state in the United States, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Last month, it passed the California state assembly last month, largely along party lines, with Democrats voting in favor.

The bill would also ensure that warehouse workers are paid overtime if they are compelled to work beyond their

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College Roommates Launch Program to Help Essential Workers in Need: ‘Make a Meaningful Impact’

A group of students at Dartmouth College are doing their part to ensure that no frontline worker struggles to obtain essential items during the coronavirus pandemic — one donor match at a time.

Back in March, roommates Amy Guan and Rine Uhm helplessly watched as their spring semester and summer plans crumbled due to the pandemic.

“We ended up losing internships, I lost my in-person graduation, but at the same time, it was hard to be sad about these losses with everything else going around in the world,” Guan, 21, tells PEOPLE. “We would spend a lot of time reading the news and sharing stories that we found interesting about the risks and struggles that essential workers have been facing.”

“The more we read, the more we realized that there was a lack of access to basic necessities that a lot of other people might have lying around their house

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MA Gyms Work To Make Customers Comfortable For Reopening

BRAINTREE, MA — Gyms in Massachusetts can reopen Monday as phase three of the state’s reopening plan begins amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Gym owners across the state expressed excitement to get back to business, but acknowledged things will not look the same as before they were forced to close in March.

Among those changes, gyms will be required to keep occupancy below 40 percent capacity and sanitize equipment after use. All customers will have to be masked, and various social distancing requirements will be in effect.

>>>MA Gyms Work To Make Customers Comfortable For Reopening

Michael Jablonn co-owns a SetPointRX franchise in Braintree. The gym has six locations throughout the state, and Jablonn said though he’s excited for his gym to reopen, there will be some challenges.

Jablonn told Patch he’s hoping to open Monday, but he’s still reviewing the state guidelines. He said SetPoint RX gyms are set up

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The coronavirus pandemic ‘has undone years of work’ for women, Yahoo Finance survey shows

Women, especially middle-aged ones, have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic in terms of job loss, fewer options for remote work, and needing more time to recover financially from the crisis, according to a new survey from Harris Poll and Yahoo Finance. 

Nearly all men between the ages of 35 and 44 — 96% — were still working the same job as before the pandemic, only 60% of women the same age were, according to the survey of 2033 Americans. The latest unemployment rate shows 8.9% unemployment for men in that age group and 9.4% in June.

Read more: Here’s how to navigate changes in your career

A similar discrepancy shows up between men and women who are 45 to 54.  More than three-quarters of men that age have the same job, but just under 6 in 10 women do, the survey found.

That difference, among others found

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How to treat head lice effectively with combs and medication

You can get rid of lice with combs, shampoos, creams, or medication.
You can get rid of lice with combs, shampoos, creams, or medication.

Eric Audras/Getty Images

  • To treat head lice, you can physically remove the lice with a special comb for lice treatment. 

  • While combing is effective, it can also be time-consuming, and other medications may also help you get rid of lice fast.

  • For example, there are specific shampoos, topical creams, and oral medications that can also help you treat head lice. 

  • This article was medically reviewed by Sharleen St. Surin-Lord, MD, a board-certified dermatologist at Visage Dermatology and assistant professor of dermatology at Howard University.

  • This story is part of Insider’s complete guide to Bug Bites. 

Head lice can quickly spread through a school, family, or group of friends. Though irritating, lice isn’t harmful to your health, and fortunately, it’s treatable with the right combs, topical treatments, and medications. 

Here’s what you need to know to treat lice effectively. 

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Unemployment money was a coronavirus lifeline. Scammers grabbed $900K in NC cases.

Federal authorities in Charlotte said Thursday they had seized $80,000 held in bank accounts that they say scammers used to steal unemployment benefits meant to help people survive the coronavirus pandemic.

It was the second such case U.S. Attorney Andrew Murray’s office announced this week. More than $48,000 was seized in that case, authorities said Tuesday.

Court documents say unknown scammers used personal information stolen from identity theft victims in North Carolina’s Western District to apply online for state and federal unemployment benefits, Murray and Reginald DeMatteis, special agent in charge of the Secret Service in Charlotte, said in Thursday’s announcement.

The fraudsters then directed bank account holders to make financial transactions with the money or transfer it to other bank accounts, often overseas. Many of the account holders, referred to in court documents as “money mules,” were involved in online romances with the scammers and didn’t know they were

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How does your ‘cyber hygiene’ stack up?

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Here's how to empower yourself to protect your personal information online. (Photo: Getty)
Here’s how to empower yourself to protect your personal information online. (Photo: Getty)

We’re all extra vulnerable these days, and I’m not just talking about COVID-19 itself. Online data breaches have escalated during pandemic-related lockdowns, according to Tech Republic, and everything from your financial information to your identity could be at risk. 

“We’re now in totally uncharted waters, especially when it comes to hacking and identity theft,” Adam Levin, cyber security expert and founder of Cyberscout, tells Yahoo Life. “Breaches have become the third certainty in life behind death and taxes.” He says that identity thieves “prey on vulnerability and distraction,” like working from home while running a household and other major upheavals in routine.

Meanwhile,

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Sign a COVID-19 Waiver FAQ

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Even as coronavirus cases climb across the nation, many businesses are trying to reopen, and some are doing so with a new twist—asking customers to sign documents waiving their right to sue in the event that they contract COVID-19 on the premises.

At the same time, some companies are asking employees to sign COVID-19 waivers, hoping to limit their liability if workers catch the virus at work. 

Should you sign such a waiver? Can your employer force you to sign one in order to return to work? And what rights are you giving up if you do?

We put those questions to a range of legal experts to create the following guidelines and recommendations.

First, a few important preliminary points. 

One: The legal and safety implications of COVID-19 waivers are somewhat distinct for these two groups—consumers and workers—and should

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Tiny desert town devastated by wildfire as it battles the coronavirus

Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. <span class="copyright">(Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. (Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)

For Genesis Palta, the pandemic had already meant a chain-reaction of adjustments.

The stay-at-home orders forced her mother to stop selling Mexican desserts to her neighbors, which cut into the family’s meager income. Her father worried about catching the coronavirus and passing it on to his family. But they depended on the $500 in cash he got paid each week, so he toiled 13-hour shifts in the vast broccoli and cauliflower fields.

To help make ends meet, Palta, 20, used part of her financial aid money for Imperial Valley College to buy toilet paper and masks online when supplies ran short in local markets. “We even started limiting the number of times we used the bathroom to save on toilet paper,” she said. “I’d constantly think:

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