Where to Buy Clear Face Masks Online

Laveta Brigham

The face mask has become an everyday staple. Wearing a face covering can help slow the spread of the coronavirus. It can also make it harder to hear and impossible to read lips, which makes day-to-day life in the age of social distancing especially difficult for the deaf and hard of hearing community.

But there’s an alternative! Clear face masks are a great option to increase visibility of the face. These masks feature transparent, see-through panels that allow others to read lips and see facial expressions, while still protecting the wearer from excessive exposure.

Available in various patterns and colors, several brands and stores are now offering clear face masks. Now you can protect yourself and others and see their lovely smile.

Many retailers have started offering personal protective equipment (PPE), including face masks for adults, face masks for kids, face masks with matching outfits and face masks for exercising.

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Educators join National Day of Resistance

Laveta Brigham

Educators gathered Monday in demonstrations across the country addressing twin concerns of a safe and equitable school environment amid the COVID-19 pandemic and the nationwide reckoning around racial justice after the killing of George Floyd.

The demonstrations, held in dozens of cities, including Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, were part of the National Day of Resistance, organized by a coalition of teachers unions, social justice organizations and the Democratic Socialists of America. They took place in a combination of socially distant rallies and car caravans.

Educators who planned to participate in the day of action spoke to NBC News’ Social Newsgathering team in advance of the rallies. Many explained that their major concerns centered around the disproportionately negative impact COVID’s new distance-learning modules had on students of color and low-income students, their concern about equitable access to online learning and, ultimately, concern about the lack of clarity in plans

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Calabasas Mayor Pens Letter To Community

Laveta Brigham

Calabasas Mayor Alicia Weintraub recently penned a letter to the community. The letter in its entirety is below:

Another week of summer has gone by and tomorrow we move into the month of August. Everybody thought we would be farther along in the journey to dealing with COVID-19, but the question we all wish we had the answer to is when will all of this be over?

One thing however is very clear and that is we all need to work together to get this virus under control. Getting our numbers down will allow schools to open more quickly and businesses to resume more normal operations. I am sure the goal of returning to normal is something that we can all agree on

The one thing that we can all do to help fight COVID-19 in Calabasas is to wear a face covering. I don’t mean to sound like a

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California donors spend $38 million trying to tilt Senate races around the country

Laveta Brigham

Top row from left: Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and challenger Jaime Harrison; Republican Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. Bottom row from left: McConnell's Democratic challenger, Amy McGrath; Arizona Democrat Mark Kelly, who is battling Sen. Martha McSally. <span class="copyright">(Associated Press)</span>
Top row from left: Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and challenger Jaime Harrison; Republican Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell. Bottom row from left: McConnell’s Democratic challenger, Amy McGrath; Arizona Democrat Mark Kelly, who is battling Sen. Martha McSally. (Associated Press)

Californians have spent $38 million and counting trying to tilt Senate contests across the nation, making the state one of the top sources of campaign contributions in races that will decide which party controls the body next year, according to campaign finance disclosures. That’s despite the state not having a Senate race on its ballot in November.

There are 35 Senate races being decided later this year, and California is among the top five donor states for at least one candidate in every contest, according to campaign finance reports filed with the Federal Election Commission. In many cases, candidates raised more from California than in their home state.

Californians

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‘Locked in a vicious cycle’

Laveta Brigham

Ebony Jones thought she was one of the lucky ones. Jones, a Black woman in her 30s, inherited a home her grandfather, a World War II veteran, had bought nearly seven decades earlier with the help of his GI Bill benefits.

But when Jones and her two children moved into the house in Compton, California, which was paid off almost 40 years ago, they soon discovered that sewage sometimes backed up in the living room and that the plumbing needed to be repaired. The distressing process of securing a home equity loan introduced Jones to an American reality.

Despite Jones’ good credit score, low debt-to-income ratio, better-than-average income and several thousand dollars of savings, lenders who immediately expressed interest stopped or went quiet when they got to two questions.

What was her ZIP code? Answer: 90220. That’s Compton, 29 percent black, 68 percent Latino.

Was she married? Answer: No.

Federal

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How to use a VPN with your PlayStation 4

Laveta Brigham

Although gaming doesn’t jump to mind when talking about a virtual private network (VPN), there are myriad uses for one on your PlayStation 4. With a VPN, you can connect to servers around the world, allowing you to shop the PlayStation Store in other regions and pair up with players on the other side of the globe. Plus, a VPN encrypts your internet connection, protecting your personal data from anyone spying on your connection, and it can get past internet service provider speed throttling.

Unfortunately, Sony doesn’t make setting up a VPN on your PS4 easy, but there are some workarounds. Here are the two best methods for how to use a VPN with your PlayStation 4.

Method 1: Use your router

The easiest way to use a VPN with your PlayStation 4 is through your router. By setting up a VPN on your router, you can automatically encrypt all

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Engineered decoys trap virus in test tube study; healthcare workers at high risk even with protections

Laveta Brigham

By Nancy Lapid

(Reuters) – The following is a brief roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

Open https://graphics.reuters.com/HEALTH-CORONAVIRUS/yxmvjqywprz/index.html in an external browser for a Reuters graphic on vaccines and treatments in development.

Engineered decoys trap virus before it can enter cells

The new coronavirus enters cells by attaching to a protein on the cell membrane called the ACE2 receptor. Scientists have now developed a decoy version of ACE2 that lures the virus and traps it, preventing it from infecting human lung cells in test tubes. “We have engineered our ACE2 Trap to bind 100 to 1,000 times tighter to the virus than normal ACE2 that is on victim cells. This provides even more potent blockage that is comparable to neutralizing antibodies,” Dr. James Wells of the University of California

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Take Back the Economy From Economists

Laveta Brigham

When I answer the phone, Zephyr Teachout quickly explains our call might be shorter than planned. Both she and I are at the whim of her two-year-old toddler, who is sleeping and could wake at any time.

Teachout, a law professor at Fordham University in New York, is best known for her runs for governor of the state and for Congress from New York’s 19th district (both races she lost). She has also written numerous books, including her latest, “BREAK ‘EM UP: Recovering Our Freedom from Big Ag, Big Tech, and Big Money.” Our discussion comes the day after historic Big Tech antitrust hearings in Congress. 

Teachout sees the antitrust discussion as a flashpoint for understanding how democracy and corruption collide. To her, concentrations of private power, as with the Big Tech companies, can’t be fixed with, say, campaign finance reform. These companies are a threat to the public sphere

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Netflix Negotiating For ‘The Woman In The Window’ With Amy Adams; Last Fox 2000 Elizabeth Gabler Project Will Be Let Go By Disney

Laveta Brigham

EXCLUSIVE: Netflix is finalizing an acquisition deal that will move The Woman in the Window out of Disney-owned 20th Century Studios and into a new window, as a global Netflix event film. The thriller, which stars Amy Adams and is directed by Joe Wright, is the last of the splashy book-based movie projects left behind by Elizabeth Gabler when Disney acquired Fox and abruptly shuttered her Fox 2000 division. Scott Rudin and Eli Bush produced.

They are finalizing the deal so it is unclear when Netflix will release the film, which is finished.

More from Deadline

Pic is an adaptation of the A.J. Finn global bestseller. While the novel’s real writer, book editor Dan Mallory, got a lively New Yorker Magazine writeup over a propensity to invent or fabricate personal information, that has nothing to do with this change of venue.

Quite simply, an adult-themed thriller isn’t a good

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The U.S. Health Care System Is Designed To Fail When It’s Needed Most

Laveta Brigham

The American health care system leaves us all vulnerable to massive costs and uneven access, even under the best of circumstances. But when the economy goes south, things get really awful.

The novel coronavirus pandemic and the United States’ feckless response to the outbreak has triggered a historic economic downturn that has cost tens of millions of jobs. Because almost half of the country ― about 160 million workers, spouses and dependents ― get their health coverage through an employer, those lost jobs almost always mean lost health insurance

Between February and May, an estimated 5.4 million people became uninsured because of job loss, according to the liberal advocacy organization Families USA. The group describes this as the largest loss of job-based health benefits in U.S. history, worse even than during the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009. 

And job losses have continued to mount since May, meaning

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