Our Favorite Online Haunts For Scoring Affordable Art

Laveta Brigham

It’s the year 2003: you’ve just settled in for an evening spent chatting on AIM while listening to a newly-burnt CD and the space surrounding you is drenched in pop-culture paraphernalia. Back in our teenage heyday, bedrooms were a private sanctuary where no wall was left uncovered by Titanic-era Leonardo DiCaprio posters and artwork from Destiny’s Child Survivor album. And while we’ve undergone more than a few changes since then, our walls are still prime real estate for personal expression — only now we’re filling them with a little less hormonally-charged angst and a lot more artistic vision.

House plants breathe life into your home and nifty storage sets can keep it looking streamlined, but investing in wall art is what will really make a place feel like your own. Whether you’re renting a first apartment with roomies or you’re solo settled in more permanent digs, giving your living

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Suze Orman says Americans get this wrong about financial advisers

Laveta Brigham

Suze Orman says most Americans have the “wrong, wrong, wrong” idea when they choose a financial adviser.

In her latest blog post, the personal finance guru cites a 2017 survey that found 53% of Americans believe financial advisers are required by law to put their clients’ best interests ahead of everything else when they give retirement advice.

But that’s not the case.

“Only advisers who operate as fiduciaries are promising to always put the client’s interest first,” Orman explains.

Retirement planning is complicated, and getting help is a smart decision. But you want help you can trust. So when you pick a financial adviser, you’d better find a fiduciary, she says, meaning an adviser who’s looking out for you.

Why finding a fiduciary is key

A rule proposed in Washington a few years ago would have required all advisers to meet the fiduciary standard and avoid conflicts of interest, like

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Russia pushes disinformation in online network

Laveta Brigham

CHICAGO (AP) — The State Department says Russia is using a well-developed online operation that includes a loose collection of proxy websites to stir up confusion around the coronavirus by amplifying conspiracy theories and misinformation.

The disclosure on Wednesday was rare for the Trump administration, which has been cautious about blaming the Kremlin for disinformation campaigns, especially around the U.S. election. Despite evidence that Russia launched a divisive disinformation operation on social media during the 2016 U.S. presidential election, the State Department’s report did not examine how — if at all — Russia is waging another online influence campaign in this year’s election.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo did, however, announce Wednesday that the U.S. would offer a reward of up to $10 million for information that identifies people working with foreign governments to interfere in the U.S. election through illegal cyber activity.

The department detailed a Russian-backed misinformation cycle

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How To Tell Friends Or Family You’re Not Going To Their Wedding Right Now

Laveta Brigham

Couples who have had their wedding plans sidelined by the coronavirus have handled it in a handful of ways: Some are simply postponing, realizing that guests may not be comfortable traveling to a wedding or being around a relatively large group of people. Others are getting creative, holding their weddings at drive-in theaters or in other socially distant, safe ways — even virtually.

And some have decided to go ahead with their weddings, perhaps because they were unable to negotiate a refund, with a pared-down guest list and masks.

That’s 100% their prerogative ― the phrase “different strokes for different folks” always applies to wedding planning ― but it does put guests who are worried about attending the event because of COVID-19 in a bind. 

It has become a surprisingly common concern, said Jodi RR Smith, an etiquette expert and author of “From Clueless to Class Act: Manners for the

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From child care stipends to flexible schedules, companies aim to help parents juggle remote learning and work again this fall

Laveta Brigham

When the state issued its stay-at-home order in March, Gina LaMonica, 39, a partner with Chicago law firm Perkins Coie, had just returned from a work trip.

Overnight, the COVID-19 pandemic turned her Park Ridge home into an office and a school as she and her husband juggled their careers and the care of their two young daughters. Worlds collided, work shifted to all hours of the day and night, and somehow, they made it to the summer, exhausted and fully employed.

“It was very difficult,” LaMonica said. “Those were long days.”

For working parents like LaMonica, the pending start of the school year, which brings the anxiety of new teachers, schedules and courses under even the best of circumstances, is looming as a major source of stress.

A growing list of companies are pushing office reopenings to 2021 and many school districts, including Chicago Public Schools, are nixing even

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Meet Zhang Yiming, the secretive Chinese billionaire behind TikTok who made over $12 billion in 2018 and called Trump’s demands to sell the app ‘unreasonable’

Laveta Brigham

ByteDance CEO Zhang Yiming makes his own TikToks — and requires his senior employees to as well.
ByteDance CEO Zhang Yiming makes his own TikToks — and requires his senior employees to as well.

Visual China Group via Getty Images; Ruobing Su/Business Insider

  • Zhang Yiming built a $16.2 billion fortune after founding ByteDance, the Chinese software developer behind TikTok.

  • Despite being one of the wealthiest people in China, Zhang is extremely private and little is known about his personal life.

  • TikTok is currently in negotiations to sell its US operations to Microsoft amid a threat of a ban from President Trump, sparking fierce criticism of Yiming on Chinese social media.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The widespread popularity of TikTok has not just created a new generation of social media stars, it’s also created a social media billionaire.

Zhang Yiming, the 36-year-old software engineer who founded the app’s parent company, now has a net worth of $16.2 billion, Forbes estimates. Despite being one of the

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Alec Baldwin Lauds Drive-In Theaters as He Tells Fans ‘Let’s Get Back to the Movies’

Laveta Brigham

Alec Baldwin Lauds Drive-In Theaters as He Tells Fans ‘Let’s Get Back to the Movies’

Alec Baldwin tells fans “let’s get back to the movies” as he lauds drive-in theaters

Alec Baldwin is urging fans to seek out the cinema — in a more traditional setting.

The actor spoke highly of drive-in theaters amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, saying in a video, “Going to the movies has evolved over the years from the drive-ins of the ’50s and ’60s to movie theater multiplexes to binge-watching at home.”

“In whatever form it’s always been about people coming together and having fun around the movies,” Baldwin continued. “Right now where we can’t physically go to the movies because of COVID, drive-ins have come back in force. It’s great to see their resurgence.”

The actor then encouraged fans to see his iconic 1988 film Beetlejuice, which was part of the Tribeca Drive-In

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Georgia class quarantined after first day of school as images of crowded school circulate online

Laveta Brigham

Twitter via Associated Press
Twitter via Associated Press

Images of students standing shoulder to shoulder and without masks have sparked renewed coronavirus fears as a classroom is placed in quarantine after the first day of school.

Pictures and video showing dozens of students walking the halls and posing for first-day-of-school photos appeared online soon after in-person classes began on Monday in Georgia.

Paulding County superintendent Brian Ottot confirmed in an email that photos from hallways at North Paulding High School in Dallas were authentic, according to the Associated Press.

“There is no question that the photo does not look good,” Mr Ottot said in the email.

It comes as a classroom at Sixes Elementary School in Georgia’s Cherokee County was shut down after a second-grade student tested positive for Covid-19 on the first day.

The student’s teacher and 20 classmates would quarantine with online classes for the next two weeks, school district spokesperson Barbara

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Jamie Nordstrom on COVID Lessons Learned, Doubling Down on Digital + 20 More Hot Topics

Laveta Brigham

FN’s first virtual summit, “The Way Ahead,” continued this afternoon with a candid conversation between Jamie Nordstrom, the president of stores for Nordstrom Inc., and FN Editorial Director Michael Atmore.

Here are edited excerpts from the session, which focused on the department store’s increased focus on culture and service during the coronavirus era and the future of the physical store. The leaders also discussed how Nordstrom is moving quickly to capitalize on digital momentum and accelerate the growth of curbside pickup and returns as well as digital shopping appointments.

More from Footwear News

Big lessons learned during coronavirus:

“We’ve come together as a team and had to learn a new way of working. In some ways, there are advantages to this. There are people on my team I talk to a lot more now than when we were in the office together. I have five screens in front of

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U.S. Cases Rise 1.1%; California Second-Worst Day: Virus Update

Laveta Brigham

(Bloomberg) — California had its second-deadliest day for virus fatalities and Florida’s case count topped 500,000. Houston hospitalizations fell to a five-week low. New York City is setting up checkpoints at key entry points to make sure travelers from 35 states or territories with high transmission rates fill out forms to enforce state quarantine rules.

Joe Biden will accept the Democratic Party’s nomination from Delaware rather than risk traveling to Milwaukee. Chicago public schools, the country’s third largest school district, will have remote learning when classes resume next month as cases spike.

Johnson & Johnson will supply 100 million doses of its experimental Covid-19 vaccine to the U.S. The U.K. agreed to invest $18 million in a Scottish vaccine-manufacturing plant, while Moderna Inc. said it has received $400 million of deposits for its potential Covid-19 shot. The global death toll from Covid-19 surpassed 700,000.

Global Tracker: Global cases top 18.6 … Read More