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Last chance to get these seven digital offers at huge discounts

TLDR: Check out these seven digital offers to improve your productivity, your work quality and even you, all at up to $3.500 off.

We could make some bad puns about independence and such, but you’d see right through that cheap writing ploy. The reality is this is a pre-July 4th collection of great digital offers, all with discounts of between $125 to $3,500. If those cold, hard numbers on some stellar productivity and protection products don’t do all the persuading that needs to be done, it’s doubtful some ridiculously stretched July 4th reference will save the day.

Instead, we’ll just make the savings even more gaudy. So if you spend $50 or more, enter the code JULYFOURTH15 during checkout and you’ll get an additional 15 percent off. Or if your total reaches $75 or more, the code JULYFOURTH20 will slash 20 percent off your purchase price. That’s a true declaration

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Election campaigning without the handshakes

The coronavirus has ended the handshake
The coronavirus has ended the handshake

For some politicians, campaigning season is one of the few times they have to get up close and personal with the public, as they try to persuade people to vote them into office.

But the global pandemic has turned everything on its head, national elections included.

Political rallies held online, socially distanced door-knocking sessions, and fist bumps instead of handshakes would have been unthinkable a few months ago, yet this is what politicians in Singapore are having to contend with as the country gears up for its general election on 10 July.

The election next Friday takes place as Singapore records more than 44,000 cases of the coronavirus, most of which stem from outbreaks in dormitories housing migrant manual labourers.

A partial lockdown was eased earlier this month, but social distancing rules are still in place – people are called to stay at least

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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An Easy, No-Frills Option for Online Banking

Although the word “bank” was once synonymous with a physical location, the reality is that more and more banks occupy only digital space. Varo, founded in 2015, is one of the many options available to today’s bankers — if they’re willing to forgo the ability to visit an actual bank building, that is.

Like other online-only banks, Varo offers deposit and checking accounts with low fees and high interest-earning rates, making it an attractive alternative to more traditional banking.

However, Varo doesn’t offer small business banking, credit cards, loans, or other extras that may be necessary for some customers, and the way it handles cash deposits is clunky and costly.

If you’re in the market for a new personal bank account, read on to learn whether or not Varo might be a fit.

In this review:

Varo Bank Review: The Pros and Cons

Here’s what we loved about Varo —

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Washington reckons with tributes to racist past

<span>Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters</span>
Photograph: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

Gordon J Davis’s first encounter with the political writings of Woodrow Wilson was as a student at Columbia University. “I’m reading this stuff and saying: ‘That’s a great man,’ and mentioned it to my father who said: ‘Well, he wasn’t such a great man to us,’” recalls the 78-year-old Davis, who is a senior lawyer in New York. “He didn’t say much more about it but then, all these years later, you find out how totally corrupt and racist he was.”

There is no shortage of tributes to Wilson in Washington – a leading thinktank, a high school, a house museum – and he is the only US president buried in the nation’s capital. But in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter protests and a mass awakening to systemic racism, his legacy of white supremacy is under scrutiny as never before.

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Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

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Indie Rapper D Prince Talks Love for Reebok Classics and the Sneaker Brand He’ll Never Wear

Click here to read the full article.

Although several albums hit streaming platforms released yesterday, Brooklyn, NY-based indie rapper D Prince — an emerging artist who is also an avid footwear and fashion fan — felt it was more appropriate to deliver his latest project, “Handsome Villain Vol. 1: Dawn Of A Prince,” on the Fourth of July.

“I chose to drop the album on Independence Day because it’s a metaphor that relates to my freedom as an indie artist. I did all of this with no big time manager, no label, no PR person, no law firm, and no booking agent — just me,” he said. “I love having the freedom to create art and put it out whenever I want. You can never put a price on that.”

More from Footwear News

The rapper’s new 14-song effort, which he said will sound fresh among the sounds of today

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Done with Facebook? Consider MeWe, Parler or old standbys such as LinkedIn

MeWe is a social network that says it has no ads, spyware, targeting, political bias, or newsfeed manipulation. In other words, it bills itself as the “anti” Facebook. 

Parler is a social media app with one point of view: conservative. It’s a place for folks who don’t like the spin at Facebook, or as it describes itself, “free expression without violence and a lack of censorship.”

So maybe, like Coca-Cola, Unilver, Starbucks and other corporations, you’ve had it with Facebook and its policies about either not curbing hate speech, or if you’re on the other side of the aisle, censoring free thought. 

Where to go? We have some ideas for you. 

MeWe bills itself as the "anti-Facebook."
MeWe bills itself as the “anti-Facebook.”

Controversy: Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

Social: Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

LinkedIn

Yes, that network that for years was thought of

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Virus Surges in Arizona, but the Rodeo Goes on

Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)
Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)

PHOENIX — As infections surged through Arizona’s desert landscape this week, word spread that the Round Valley Rodeo, a century-old tradition luring calf ropers, youth riders and big crowds to the mountain town of Springerville, might be called off. The fate of the Fourth of July parade in the nearby hamlet of Eagar seemed in doubt, too, as Gov. Doug Ducey prepared to issue new pandemic guidance.

But Ducey stopped short of ordering a halt to such events, and as of Friday, he had not required Arizonans to wear face coverings in public spaces, as Texas did Thursday. The rodeo and parade will march ahead Saturday as planned, even as infections in the state spiral.

Such is the way fiercely independent Arizona has handled the virus from the

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Duffy attacks Netflix’s irresponsible release of 365 Days

Welsh singer Duffy has sent an open letter to Netflix publicly criticising their “irresponsible” release of Polish film 365 Days, which “glamorises the brutal reality of sex trafficking, kidnapping, and rape.”

Earlier this year, Duffy revealed that she had been drugged, abducted, raped, and held hostage over a four week period around a decade ago.

Read More: Netflix’s ‘The Old Guard’ hoping to kickstart a trilogy

365 Days, which has received terrible reviews but has been in Netflix’s top 10 ever since it was released last month, revolves around a Polish woman being imprisoned and abused by a Sicilian man for an entire year, as he wants her to fall in love with him. 

It has proven to be such a huge success that a sequel was reportedly in the works. However the COVID-19 pandemic has delayed its development. 

365 Days has been a huge success for Netflix,

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