Personal

How the U.S. seeks to protect children’s privacy online

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – TikTok is under investigation for allegedly violating a settlement reached with U.S. authorities last year that resolved charges the popular app broke rules governing how children’s personal information is treated online.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which enforces the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, or COPPA, and the Justice Department, which often files court actions for the FTC, have opened a preliminary investigation into the matter involving the China-based video-sharing app.

Under rules dating to 1998 legislation, COPPA requires websites to get parental permission to collect data on children under the age of 13. Websites or online services are also expected to ban third parties from collecting the data.

COPPA also applies to mobile apps, gaming platforms and internet-connected toys, among others.

Under pressure from the FTC, TikTok, owned by China’s ByteDance, agreed in early 2019 to pay a $5.7 million civil penalty for violating COPPA by

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Visa Makes Payment Easy in Asia Pacific With Click to Pay

Visa Inc. V has expanded its click-to-pay feature in the Asia Pacific, which offers online shoppers an online checkout option that is fast, simple and secure.

The click-to-pay facility is built on the EMV Secure Remote Commerce (SRC) industry specification, accessible to the participating Australian and New Zealand businesses.

The service will be extended gradually to other regions, such as Hong Kong, Mainland China, Malaysia and Singapore, later in the year.

The launch of this service comes at just the opportune time when e-commerce saw a surge due to the COVID-19 outbreak. In order to follow strict lockdown and social-distancing protocols, people avoided shopping via bricks-and-mortar stores and stuck more to purchasing stuff online, which in turn, drove the need for digital payments. With 41% of consumers in the Asia Pacific belt making five or more e-commerce transactions in the past three months will make the click-to-pay feature a big

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What Is Toxic Positivity? Why It’s OK To Not Be OK Right Now.

“Everything will be fine.” “This too shall pass.” “Stay positive! It could be worse.” 

If you’ve ever gone through a difficult time (a breakup, a job loss), you’ve probably heard some of these phrases ad nauseam from friends and family. People who say them no doubt have good intentions; they’re simply trying to put a rosy filter on the tough time you’re having. “It gets better, stay optimistic,” they assure you. 

But if statements like this are all you’re hearing from your friends and family, that excess of positivity can be, well, negative.

This kind of encouragement and self-talk is so common that mental health experts have a name for it: toxic positivity. 

“Toxic positivity is the idea that we should focus only on positive emotions and the positive aspects of life,” said Heather Monroe, a clinical social worker and director of program development at Newport Institute.

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Coronavirus Pandemic Shifts Back-to-School Spending

The coronavirus pandemic isn’t stopping parents from hitting the back-to-school sales, but it may be changing what’s on their shopping lists.

Back-to-school spending for children in grades K-12 is expected to hit $28.1 billion — or $529 per student — which is relatively flat from last year, when $27.8 billion was spent, according to the 2020 Back-to-School survey by international accounting and professional services firm Deloitte, released July 8.

However, the uncertainty over whether students will be learning in-person or virtually is driving many parents to spend more on technology upgrades.

Improving the learning experience with technology

As the school season nears, parents have a lot on their mind. Two-thirds of the parents surveyed said they were anxious about sending their children back to school this fall because of the pandemic.

In addition, a majority of parents were not satisfied with their children’s learning experience during the last school year.

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How ‘Roma’ Star Yalitza Aparicio Is Supporting Indigenous Filmmakers in Mexico

Click here to read the full article.

Two years after her historic Oscar nomination for “Roma,” Mexican actress Yalitza Aparicio has yet to star in another movie, but she’s found another way to stay busy: In the midst of throwing her support behind efforts to support the indigenous film community in Mexico, Aparicio has become one of the country’s foremost activists for its historically marginalized people.

Cultural spaces — including movie theaters — have historically been inaccessible for indigenous communities across Mexico. By and large, these spaces tend to concentrate in major cities and, and more importantly, economic inequality makes them financially off-limits for most. But as the country begins to reckon with its centuries-old issues of race and class affecting the vast majority of the population, individual towns have launched enterprises to bridge the gap and function as local windows into the world at large.

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SELF’s Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Skin Care

Depending on who you ask, having a skin-care routine could mean a million different things. Is it putting on the occasional acne-fighting sheet mask? Lining up all 18 of your expensive serums for the perfect #shelfie? Reading and somehow understanding the textbook of an ingredients list on every product? Or is it carefully applying juuust the right amount of prescription cream to calm down a patch of psoriasis without feeling too greasy?

The truth is, of course, that it can be all of the above—and each skin-care routine is necessarily as unique and individual as the person following it (or attempting to, anyway). But as skin care has become trendier and its definition has become wider in scope, it’s also gotten a little more intimidating and confusing for a beginner to get started.

That’s where we come in. As you begin your skin-care quest, we hope to answer here in

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As talk builds for second stimulus, questions remain about first payout

And now, time for “It’s Not a Stimulus Scam, the Sequel.”

First, consumers had to be assured in June that the navy blue, Visa debit cards that just showed up in the mail beginning in late May really did contain stimulus money. The unexpected plastic card wasn’t a scam or a special promotion, as some thought. 

Now, letters from the U.S. Department of the Treasury are being sent in July to alert consumers about unused prepaid cards and how to activate the cards in order to spend your Economic Impact Payment, if you have one sitting in a drawer somewhere. 

The letter also will show you how to get a replacement card, if you’ve lost the card or thrown it away. And this letter isn’t a scam either.

The good news: The latest envelopes containing these letters will state in red: “Not a bill or an advertisement. Important information about

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4 Ways You Were Conditioned To Hate Fitness As A Kid

Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Experiences we have when we’re young are incredibly formative ― especially when it comes to something like exercise.

Fitness isn’t just physical; it also has a major effect on the mind. If you have a positive outlook on it (or even just a tolerable one), the likelihood is pretty good that exercise will improve your mental health. But if you’ve had negative emotions about working out in the past, chances are that moving your body can cause more stress than you may even think is worth it.

Part of that stems from how you may have thought about exercise when you were young. There are a handful of subtle ways we can be conditioned to hate fitness as kids. Below are just a few of them:

Mandated School Fitness Tests And Curriculum

Requiring students to

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Foreign students fret over being sent home after U.S. visa rule

By Kristina Cooke, Mimi Dwyer and Humeyra Pamuk

(Reuters) – When the phone rang Tuesday morning, Raul Romero had barely slept.

The 21-year-old Venezuelan, on a scholarship at Ohio’s Kenyon College, had spent hours pondering his options after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced Monday that international students taking classes fully online for the fall semester would have to transfer to a school with in-person classes or leave the country.

A college employee called Romero to say he would not be immediately affected, but warned that a local outbreak of COVID-19 could force the school to suspend in-person classes during the year. If that happened, he may need to go home.

Romero is one of hundreds of thousands of international students in the United States on F-1 and M-1 visas faced with the prospect of having to leave the country mid-pandemic if their schools go fully online.

For some students,

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ICE order leaves foreign students helpless

A new federal immigration directive that threatens the deportation of international college students who take all of their classes online this fall left Florida college administrators scrambling and students panicking about their futures.

The directive issued Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement says all students with F-1 or M-1 student visas in the U.S. must go back to their home countries if their courses are entirely online in the fall, a measure many colleges and universities are adopting due to the spread of the coronavirus. Harvard University announced Monday that all of its teaching will be done remotely for the fall semester

The measure is expected to impact at least 1 million students nationwide and more than 10,000 students in the South Florida region, according to ICE officials, local university statistics and College Factual, a New York-based company that gathers college data from the Department of Education.

International students,

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