Pot shops are copying Amazon and Uber Eats

Laveta Brigham

(GETTY)
(GETTY)

The cannabis sector is tearing pages from the playbooks of technology titans during COVID-19, deploying ideas inspired by Amazon (AMZN) and Uber Eats (UBER) to reshape how consumers buy pot.

The pandemic spurred a flurry of innovation as governments locked down brick-and-mortar cannabis stores in an effort to stop the spread of the virus. In Ontario, private retailers fast-tracked new online sales channels temporarily opened up by the province, allowing them to stay in business after stores were ordered closed between April 5 and the first phase of conditional reopening on May 19.

Many within the industry want the Ford government to make the concessions granted to weather the virus permanent. Prior to COVID-19, legal online sales in Ontario were the exclusive domain of the province-run Ontario Cannabis Store.

While it’s unclear if the window of digital opportunity will remain open for private shops once state of emergency orders

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2 Hoboken Parks Reopen; What To Do If Server Isn’t Wearing A Mask

Laveta Brigham

HOBOKEN, NJ – Mayor Ravi Bhalla said Thursday morning that one new case of coronavirus was reported in the city Wednesday, bringing the total to 572 residents who tested positive. Before that, there were no reports of new cases since the previous Wednesday.

There have been no new deaths reported since May 21. On June 9, Bhalla said the city had learned of a woman in her 80s who had died of the virus a month earlier but hadn’t been counted with residents. She was the 30th announced case.

Bhalla said Thursday, “No demonstrators [in the local George Floyd protest] from Hoboken tested at Riverside were positive for COVID-19.” Bhalla has said that mask-wearing helped the protestors. In fact, new studies have supported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommendation that mask-wearing is very helpful in cutting down on (but not eliminating entirely) the spread of the virus.

Even

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DACA recipients in California rejoice at ‘life saving’ Supreme Court ruling

Laveta Brigham

Los Angeles DACA recipient Denea Joseph was born in Belize and came to the U.S. when she was 7. <span class="copyright">(Steve Saldivar / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Los Angeles DACA recipient Denea Joseph was born in Belize and came to the U.S. when she was 7. (Steve Saldivar / Los Angeles Times)

For years, Denea Joseph knew that her life as a Black woman without legal status in the U.S. was precarious. Born in Belize, the 26-year-old left her home on a visa when she was 7 years old to join her grandmother in South Los Angeles.

When her visa expired, she remained in the U.S. without legal status because she had no real pathway to legal residency. Even after she was granted immigration relief under a 2012 Obama-era policy that allowed her to live and work legally in the United States, Joseph felt the weight of uncertainty.

“I knew an executive order could be changed any day, at any moment,” said Joseph, one of an estimated 700,000 immigrants who are recipients of the Deferred Action for

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Government loans helped save millions of jobs, but the money is running out for many

Laveta Brigham

Server Conor Susi, center, takes orders from a dine-in group at Faith & Flower in downtown Los Angeles on June 6. <span class="copyright">(Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Server Conor Susi, center, takes orders from a dine-in group at Faith & Flower in downtown Los Angeles on June 6. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

The surprising jobs rebound in May, which fueled hopes for a fast recovery from the pandemic recession, was almost certainly due in large part to tens of billions of dollars of forgivable government loans to small businesses.

Known as the Paycheck Protection Program, the initiative — part of the much larger COVID-19 relief package enacted by Congress when the pandemic first began pounding the economy — has to date lent more than $512 billion to struggling small businesses, including about $67 billion in California. The money does not need to be repaid if funds are used to keep workers on the payroll and other conditions are met.

The novel idea to discourage layoffs has no precedent in past economic crises.

And without it,

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Juneteenth marks when last slaves were freed

Laveta Brigham

Juneteenth commemorates when all enslaved African Americans learned they were free 155 years ago. Now, with support growing for the racial justice movement, 2020 may be remembered as the year the holiday reached a new level of recognition.

While the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the South in 1863, it wasn’t enforced in many places until after the end of the Civil War two years later. Confederate soldiers surrendered in April 1865, but word didn’t reach all enslaved black people until June 19, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to Galveston, Texas.

Celebrations have typically included parades, barbecues, concerts and readings of the Emancipation Proclamation. But after massive demonstrations over George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police, there has been a seismic shift to further elevate black voices. That desire is being felt as states and cities move to make Juneteenth an official paid holiday.

Here’s

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Edited Transcript of 7731.T earnings conference call or presentation 28-May-20 10:59am GMT

Laveta Brigham

Tokyo Jun 18, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of Nikon Corp earnings conference call or presentation Thursday, May 28, 2020 at 10:59:00am GMT

Hello, everybody. This is Tokunari, serving as CFO as of April 1. I would like to thank our investors, analysts and the media for this opportunity.

In order to prevent a further outbreak of COVID-19, we are at this time, holding this session through the Internet. I know this is causing you inconveniences, but Nikon is giving its top priority to secure the safety of our employees and their families and all the stakeholders, including our customers. Hope you understand this, and I do appreciate for your understanding.

That said, I will cover the financial results for the year ended March 31, 2020, as well as our forecast for the year ending March 31, 2021. Slide 3 shows the summary for the year ended March 31, … Read More

16 Splurges That Save You Money in the Long Run

Laveta Brigham

Smart shoppers know that comparing prices to find the best deal can pay off. However, buying the cheapest option doesn’t always mean you’re actually getting the best deal. In fact, it can make financial sense to spend more on some products and services to save money over the years.

“Sometimes, we might think we’re saving money on cheaper items, when in reality, splurging a little on the more expensive competitor would have saved us more over the long run,” said Matt Dworetsky, president of Dworetsky Financial in Wall Township, New Jersey. Keep reading to find out when splurging on the pricier option can help save you money over time.

Last updated: March 27, 2020

Energy-Efficient Appliances

Spending more on energy-efficient appliances can help you save money in the long run, said Monica Lam, a financial blogger at LuckyMojito.com and mother of two. In particular, shelling out $50 to $100 more

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Domestic abusers use tech that connects as a weapon during coronavirus lockdowns

Laveta Brigham

<span class="caption">Technology plays a major role in violence against women and girls.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/sad-teen-with-a-phone-in-her-bedroom-royalty-free-image/820379104" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images">AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images</a></span>
Technology plays a major role in violence against women and girls. AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic has driven much of daily life – work, school, socializing – online. Unfortunately, perpetrators of violence against women and girls are also increasingly turning to technology in response to the pandemic.

Globally, violence against women and girls is a problem of pandemic proportions, with one in three experiencing an act of physical or sexual violence in her lifetime. Most of these acts of violence are perpetrated by intimate partners and family. In the United States, women are at increased risk of violence from a current or former intimate partner, and they are more likely than men to suffer injuries, be treated in emergency rooms and be killed as a result of intimate partner violence.

Violence against women and girls is costly for victims and their families, communities and society. The problem is

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How much and where do I pay taxes on the extra $600? Your COVID-19 money questions, answered

Laveta Brigham

It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

There are a few ways you can pay taxes on your unemployment.

You can choose to have them taken out when applying online for jobless benefits for some states. Or you can fill out Federal Form W-4V Voluntary Withholding Request and have federal taxes automatically have taxes taken out, according to Greene-Lewis. When you fill out the form you can request to have up to 10% taken out, she added. 

Once you are working again, if you have an employer you can adjust your federal tax withholding using … Read More

Business leaders fear ‘flaming on social media’ if they criticize President Donald Trump: Fast Company Editor-in-Chief

Laveta Brigham

Many business leaders disapprove of President Donald Trump’s response to the coronavirus outbreak, but fear the consequences of saying so publicly — according to Stephanie Mehta, editor-in-chief of the business publication Fast Company.

In a newly released interview, taped on April 27, Mehta said many top executives find it “frustrating” they cannot criticize Trump over his handling of the pandemic due to potential damage for their company and personal backlash they may face online.

“It’s frustrating for a lot of leaders in business because they feel they can’t come out and call the president out on it,” says Mehta, a former business reporter at the Wall Street Journal and executive editor at Fortune.

“The consequences can be pretty great, not only to their business but also they become the subject of some pretty, pretty serious flaming on social media,” she adds.

Since Trump took office, he has sharply rebuked some

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