12 million Americans still waiting for unemployment benefits

Laveta Brigham

Six months into the pandemic, some laid-off workers find themselves waiting weeks or even months to receive their unemployment benefits. States blame antiquated technology and say their staffers can’t keep up with the continued surge of claims, while worker advocates say these are just excuses for mismanagement and a failure to prioritize funding for upgrades. As this plays out, an untold number of families are hanging on by a financial thread.

“I’m living with my mother now, out of necessity,” said Adia Romaine-Figueroa, a Sacramento-area veterinary assistant who lost her job in April and inexplicably stopped receiving unemployment payments at the beginning of May, she said. “I have a balance of $10,000, of which I’ve received $2,000.” Romaine-Figueroa said she has spent hours trying to reach someone — anyone — at the state’s Economic Development Department to no avail.

Half a country away, Indiana hotel worker David Kruszewski describes a

Read More

This Year’s Benefits Open Enrollment Period Is an Opportunity You Don’t Want to Miss

Laveta Brigham

With COVID-19 expected to be a part of our daily lives for the foreseeable future, many Americans are expecting that they could get sick. In fact, Voya research shows that more than half of Americans (52%) believe someone close to them will be infected with the virus. At the same time, many are also discovering — often to their surprise — that their medical insurance has coverage gaps, so if they do find themselves needing care, they might need to dip into their personal or emergency savings to make up the difference.

With the fall open enrollment season approaching, so too is the opportunity to take advantage of previously untapped benefits offered by your employer. In fact, many are now paying closer attention to their workplace benefits during these uncertain times. New Voya research finds that nearly 7-in-10 employees (71%) plan to spend more time reviewing their voluntary benefits as

Read More

Are the benefits of Apple’s App Store worth 30% of your revenue?

Laveta Brigham

With Apple’s recent appearance before the US congress, it’s been working hard to justify the 30% revenue cut it takes from all apps on its platform. The company just published a study looking at other similar app platforms and their revenue cuts to make the case, “We’re just like everyone else.”

Not surprisingly, a lot has been written about how Apple’s walled garden is anti-competitive and particularly unfair to indie developers. Perhaps this is the wrong approach to defend their pricing model. Just look to the internet or cell phone industries as one example where pricing is pretty consistent for US consumers, but they still are not receiving a good deal.

A better approach might be to look more concretely at the financial benefit an app publisher receives when on Apple’s platform, and whether that truly offsets the costs.

What are you really getting from Apple’s Platform?

Read More

NYC welfare benefit hotline is a mess months after benefits offices shut down, advocates claim

Laveta Brigham

The shutdown of city welfare offices due to the pandemic meant many New Yorkers would have to rely on their phones to apply for benefits like food stamps and job assistance.

But that hasn’t been working out very well, according to the Urban Justice Center, which recently conducted an audit of the city hotline devoted to those types of calls.

The Justice Center, which is focused on helping people secure public benefits, found that more than 50% of calls to the city Human Resources Administration were dropped and 20% had wait times of more than eight minutes.

Callers also had difficulty getting through to translators and had to struggle through English-only pre-recorded messages, according to the group, which conducted the audit through calls it made between June 23 and Aug. 4.

“People need to be able to get in touch with the city administration that is responsible for administering critical

Read More

B.C. won’t test asymptomatic teachers, CERB extended with new benefits coming

Laveta Brigham

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

Read More

Flu shot will be essential this fall, Federal government extends CERB, offers new COVID-19 benefits

Laveta Brigham

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

Read More

Federal government extends CERB, offers new COVID-19 benefits for Canadians

Laveta Brigham

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

Read More

Millions of Americans scrape by after benefits expire: ‘I lost everything’

Laveta Brigham

A single mother of three children, Sandra Bivin of Denver, Colorado, is now being forced to try to survive on $58 per week on unemployment since the $600 per week expanded unemployment benefits expired on 26 July.

It is not easy.

Before the pandemic hit, Bivin worked as a driver for Uber and Lyft, and had a part-time job in accounting. Because of her part-time position, she doesn’t qualify for pandemic unemployment assistance offered to independent contractors until her regular employment runs out in another seven weeks.

ineligible for the $400 per week unemployment benefits from Donald Trump’s executive order when it goes into effect.” data-reactid=”29″In the meantime, Bivin has struggled to make ends meet and will be ineligible for the $400 per week unemployment benefits from Donald Trump’s executive order when it goes into effect.

“My mortgage alone is $1,100 a month. I already sold my car in

Read More

Here’s what you need to know about unemployment benefits eligibility

Laveta Brigham

Some of the requirements for unemployment insurance have changed and the more than 30 million Americans receiving benefits will have to check more boxes to stay eligible.

When applying for unemployment benefits you have to file a claim with your state’s unemployment insurance program as soon as possible after losing your job or getting hours cut.

Many Americans who are ineligible for unemployment insurance (UI) may qualify for the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) that covers self-employed individuals, contractors, and others and is available until the end of January 2021.

Employment insurance claims in Canada during the Coronavirus pandemic
Employment insurance claims in Canada during the Coronavirus pandemic

What are the requirements for UI?

The first requirement is that you should have lost your job through no fault of your own and you lost your job because of a lack of available work.

The second requirement is to meet the criteria for wages earned or time worked. In most states,

Read More

As extra benefits expire, some unemployed Americans are waiting for their first check

Laveta Brigham

The extra $600 a week that unemployed Americans have been receiving in benefits amid the coronavirus pandemic is ending as Congress struggles to find common ground on key issues.

And while Democrats, Republicans, and the White House negotiate, unemployed Americans will rely solely on state unemployment checks until any deal is reachedsand as they wait for the job market to recover.

But some Americans still haven’t received their first unemployment check since the pandemic began.

A man wears a protective face mask decorated with a question mark in lower Manhattan during the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York, U.S., May 22, 2020. (Photo: Getty Images)

Leo Gertner, a lawyer who represents employees in the entertainment industry in New York City, filed for unemployment on March 2 and still hasn’t gotten a check.

“Twice I received letters asking for more information — the first one asked for

Read More