Coronavirus

Broadway Star Nick Cordero Dies at 41 After Over 90 Days in Hospital from Coronavirus Complications

Broadway star Nick Cordero has died after a months-long battle with the coronavirus. He was 41.

Cordero, whose Broadway credits include Waitress and Rock of Ages, died on Sunday morning at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where he had been hospitalized for over 90 days.

He is survived by his wife Amanda Kloots, whom he wed in September 2017, and their 1-year-old son Elvis Eduardo.

“God has another angel in heaven now. My darling husband passed away this morning. He was surrounded in love by his family, singing and praying as he gently left this earth. ⠀ I am in disbelief and hurting everywhere. My heart is broken as I cannot imagine our lives without him. Nick was such a bright light. He was everyone’s friend, loved to listen, help and especially talk. He was an incredible actor and musician. He loved his family and loved being

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Schools buy miles of plexiglass ahead of potential reopenings amid coronavirus pandemic

As millions of students return to school — be it K-12 or university — they’ll return to familiar settings in their classroom with one obvious addition: layers of plexiglass.

It remains unclear if schools — universities in particular — can reopen campuses amid a surge of coronavirus cases and new restrictions such as the 14-day quarantines demanded from those who travel from various to the tri-state area of Connecticut, New Jersey and New York.

Sheets of plexiglass would play a big role in a reopening, and schools across the country are investing in the plastic sheet to create a division in common spaces such as in libraries, classrooms — and even school buses — to defend against transmission of coronavirus.

“We’re hitting records… week in week out, at this point from a sales perspective,” Ryan Schroeder, CEO of Plaskolite, one of the country’s biggest plexiglass makers, told Yahoo Finance. “Orders

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Coronavirus pandemic may lead to couples putting off divorce, survey finds

Getty Images/iStockphoto
Getty Images/iStockphoto

The coronavirus pandemic could lead to married couples who were previously considering divorce to delay proceedings, a survey has suggested.

In April, YouGov carried out a poll of more than 1,000 adults across the UK who had previously been divorced.

The participants were asked whether the virus outbreak would influence their decision to divorce their partner.

Of the respondents, 28 per cent said they would be less likely to pursue divorce due to the Covid-19 crisis.

A small percentage (6 per cent) said that the pandemic would make them feel more inclined to go through divorce proceedings, while the rest said it would either not be a factor in their decision or they did not know if it would be.

The survey of 1,005 adults, which was conducted for family law firm Ampla Finance, also find a marked difference between the way in which women and men felt

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Hoboken Mayor Cites New Coronavirus Spike, All From Travelers

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla sent out an “important update” to residents Saturday morning saying the Heath Department reported 13 new coronavirus cases Thursday and Friday, the most since mid-May. He said all of the people who tested positive had recently — it was determined during contact tracing — traveled for work and pleasure to “hot spot” states where coronavirus is rising.

Bhalla said they’d traveled to states on the quarantine list of 16 states, including Florida, Texas, North Carolina, and South Carolina. New Jersey residents returning from those states have been told to get a coronavirus test and isolate for 14 days. Some of those states loosened their coronavirus restrictions early and now have reinstated orders to close bars and beaches.

In the middle of June, Hoboken had a week in which the city saw only one new coronavirus case — before the mass reopenings and travel

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Hoboken Mayor Announces New Coronavirus Spike, All From Travelers

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla sent out an “important update” to residents Saturday morning saying the Heath Department reported 13 new coronavirus cases Thursday and Friday, the most since mid-May. He said all of the people who tested positive — it was determined during contact tracing — had recently traveled for work and pleasure to “hot spot” states in the country where coronavirus is rising.

Bhalla said the states they’d traveled to are on the state’s quarantine list of 16 states, including Florida, Texas, North Carolina, and South Carolina. New Jersey residents returning from those states have been told to get a coronavirus test and isolate for 14 days. Some of those states loosened their coronavirus restrictions early and now have reinstated orders to close bars and beaches.

In the middle of June, Hoboken had a week in which the city saw only one new coronavirus case —

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A growing chorus of coronavirus patients have had symptoms for more than 100 days

Felecia Jester using a nebulizer (left) and at the emergency room (right).
Felecia Jester using a nebulizer (left) and at the emergency room (right).

Felecia Jester

  • Business Insider spoke to 17 coronavirus patients who have had symptoms for more than 100 days.

  • Few of them have gotten a clear answer from doctors as to why they’re still sick.

  • Their lives have changed drastically in the last few months.

  • Some face unemployment or might have to file for disability as they stare down the barrel of chronic illness.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The people who’ve had coronavirus symptoms for more than 100 days have a nickname for themselves: the long-haulers.

They’ve been dealing with the virus for much longer than most of their peers, and far longer than their doctors anticipated. As their illnesses persist without explanation, these patients turn to online support groups on Facebook, Reddit, and Slack, where they seek medical advice, swap war stories, and share updates

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NC not doing enough to protect immigrant farmworkers from coronavirus, advocates say

Reported coronavirus cases are rising among seasonal farmworkers living in migrant worker housing, a group setting like nursing homes that the state is watching.

On Tuesday, 128 new COVID-19 cases across four farms were reported through June, according to the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

That was more than double the 49 cases previously reported by The News & Observer. They bring the total number of infected farmworkers living in the camps to 177.

Six farms had active outbreaks in June compared to five active outbreaks reported in May. DHHS defines an outbreak as more than two cases but is only reporting them at facilities with at least 10 residents.

The cases reported are among seasonal immigrant farmworkers from Mexico who come to work in the United States on a temporary visa and live in grower-provided housing. Other infected workers who live in private residences not on farm

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The coronavirus pandemic ‘has undone years of work’ for women, Yahoo Finance survey shows

Women, especially middle-aged ones, have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic in terms of job loss, fewer options for remote work, and needing more time to recover financially from the crisis, according to a new survey from Harris Poll and Yahoo Finance. 

Nearly all men between the ages of 35 and 44 — 96% — were still working the same job as before the pandemic, only 60% of women the same age were, according to the survey of 2033 Americans. The latest unemployment rate shows 8.9% unemployment for men in that age group and 9.4% in June.

Read more: Here’s how to navigate changes in your career

A similar discrepancy shows up between men and women who are 45 to 54.  More than three-quarters of men that age have the same job, but just under 6 in 10 women do, the survey found.

That difference, among others found

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Unemployment money was a coronavirus lifeline. Scammers grabbed $900K in NC cases.

Federal authorities in Charlotte said Thursday they had seized $80,000 held in bank accounts that they say scammers used to steal unemployment benefits meant to help people survive the coronavirus pandemic.

It was the second such case U.S. Attorney Andrew Murray’s office announced this week. More than $48,000 was seized in that case, authorities said Tuesday.

Court documents say unknown scammers used personal information stolen from identity theft victims in North Carolina’s Western District to apply online for state and federal unemployment benefits, Murray and Reginald DeMatteis, special agent in charge of the Secret Service in Charlotte, said in Thursday’s announcement.

The fraudsters then directed bank account holders to make financial transactions with the money or transfer it to other bank accounts, often overseas. Many of the account holders, referred to in court documents as “money mules,” were involved in online romances with the scammers and didn’t know they were

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Tiny desert town devastated by wildfire as it battles the coronavirus

Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. <span class="copyright">(Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)</span>
Ana Valenzuela stares at the pile of ashes and debris where her home in Niland, Calif., once stood. (Eduardo Contreras / San Diego Union-Tribune)

For Genesis Palta, the pandemic had already meant a chain-reaction of adjustments.

The stay-at-home orders forced her mother to stop selling Mexican desserts to her neighbors, which cut into the family’s meager income. Her father worried about catching the coronavirus and passing it on to his family. But they depended on the $500 in cash he got paid each week, so he toiled 13-hour shifts in the vast broccoli and cauliflower fields.

To help make ends meet, Palta, 20, used part of her financial aid money for Imperial Valley College to buy toilet paper and masks online when supplies ran short in local markets. “We even started limiting the number of times we used the bathroom to save on toilet paper,” she said. “I’d constantly think:

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