Brooklyn Honors 80 ‘COVID Heroes’ With Borough Hall Ceremony

Laveta Brigham

BROOKLYN, NY — A 12-year-old who used her allowance and birthday money to buy lunches for healthcare workers.

A “Hamilton” star who mobilized out-of-work Broadway designers to make personal protective equipment.

A man working as a clown in his free time to put smiles on the faces of children in group homes.

These were just a few of the more than 80 Brooklynites who were honored Tuesday for helping the borough through the roughest moments of the coronavirus pandemic.

(Anna Quinn/Patch).
(Anna Quinn/Patch).

The ceremony, put on by Borough President Eric Adams, gave certificates to 81 “COVID Heroes” at Brooklyn Borough Hall. It was an especially-large edition of the borough president’s “Heroes of the Month” series, which recognizes every day Brooklynites for acts of good service.

The heroes, Adams said, reflect the diversity of the borough, where 47 percent of residents speak a language other than English at home.

“I am proud

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How online music company Bandcamp became the toast of the COVID age

Laveta Brigham

The Bandcamp team at their annual meetup in Arizona. <span class="copyright">(Richard Morgenstein)</span>
The Bandcamp team at their annual meetup in Arizona. (Richard Morgenstein)

Like thousands of artists, Nashville singer and songwriter Emma Swift faced a reckoning in March after all of her gigs were scrapped.

“When the pandemic hit, I lost my job as a touring musician. And in losing that job, I lost my primary income stream,” she said during a recent phone call. Pondering the prospect of releasing “Blonde on the Tracks,” her new folk-rock album of Bob Dylan songs, to major music streaming services minus any sense of when she’d be able to tour in support of it, Swift ran the numbers.

“It wasn’t actually going to be financially sensible or sustainable for me to release it on mainstream streaming platforms such as Spotify or Apple,” Swift explained. “I was only gonna be able to survive as an artist if I used a platform that would allow me to

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FTSE 100 falls as investors fret over rising Covid cases

Laveta Brigham

Bloomberg via Getty Images
Bloomberg via Getty Images

The FTSE 100 is expected to open lower this morning amid frets over rising coronavirus infection rates at home and abroad, and a worries that the economic bounceback seen since lockdown lifted may not be sustained.

The blue chip index was forecast to open 30 points lower at 5,977 after a choppy week last week. Markets initially rose on a step up in M&A activity – notably Nvidia’s blockbuster takeover of tech giant ARM in the UK – before slipping back as European Covid infection rates marched up.

This week’s tone is set to be steered by central bankers with US Federal Reserve chairman Jay Powell set to appear several times across the Pond and Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey making an address over here.

Powell is in a tight spot with US president Donald Trump keen to talk up the state of the country

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Kushner Predicted N.Y. Would ‘Suffer’ With COVID, And ‘That’s Their Problem’

Laveta Brigham

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner coldly informed a group of business leaders earlier this year that the state of New York would “suffer” with COIVD-19, adding: “That’s their problem,” sources told Vanity Fair.

The shocking comment was one of several in the article exposing Kushner’s dismissive, compassion-challenged attitude about the rapacious pandemic that as of Saturday has claimed close to 200,000 lives in the U.S., including more than 33,000 in New York.

He made the comments at a meeting with business leaders he hosted at the White House ― some were online ― on March 21, according to Vanity Fair, when President Donald Trump already knew how lethal COVID-19 was.

A number of people attending the meeting told the magazine that they were “stunned” by Kushner’s chilly attitude about the suffering and death facing Americans.

When one business representative brought up the devastating problems states were having obtaining adequate

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Miami-Dade’s first COVID budget passed without much pain. The problem: Next year

Laveta Brigham

With sales taxes plunging, a hotel industry ravaged and nightclubs closed by emergency law, Miami-Dade commissioners passed a $9 billion budget Thursday night that expands county hiring, preserves services and keeps property tax rates flat.

Before their votes during the online meeting, commissioners warned not to expect such an easy time for next year’s spending plan.

“Those of who stay here are going to face a lot of problems in the future budgets,” said Commissioner Rebeca Sosa, one of six commissioners assured seats in 2021 on the 13-seat board, which is facing historic churn this fall from term limits.

“I am very concerned about next year,” said Commissioner Jose “Pepe” Diaz, who, like Sosa, doesn’t have to leave his seat until 2022. “Nobody is giving a happy face to next year’s budget… We need to continue to tighten the belt.“

It was also the final budget proposed by Mayor Carlos

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All the countries UK holidaymakers can visit now without quarantine or Covid certificate

Laveta Brigham

Venice at sunrise (istock)
Venice at sunrise (istock)

The list of countries that Britons can travel to without having to quarantine for 14 days on return is sadly diminishing week by week.

The latest to go is the Portuguese mainland. As of 12 September, England and Northern Ireland followed Scotland and Wales in removing the country from the travel corridors list.

Other removals included Hungary, Réunion and French Polynesia.

France, Malta and the Netherlands were removed from the exemption list in the middle of August, alongside Monaco, Switzerland, Turks & Caicos and Aruba.

They joined Andorra, Belgium and the Bahamas, as well as Spain, Serbia and Luxembourg.

All of these destinations were previously given the green light for travel, but have been removed after reporting spikes in coronavirus cases.

To confuse things further, holidaymakers have to check two different government lists: the Department for Transport’s travel corridors list (so you don’t have to quarantine

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Off the road since March, Miami-Dade’s scooter business awaits a COVID reprieve

Laveta Brigham

In a Little Haiti warehouse, a good chunk of Miami’s once bustling scooter fleet sits in the dark, its pink wheels collecting dust.

Diego Perelmuter’s job is to tend to the hundreds of scooters Lyft dumped here on March 18, when Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez used emergency powers to order a halt to all bike and scooter rentals as a way to slow the spread of COVID-19.

It was the fifth of 83 emergency orders Gimenez would sign over six months, making scooter rentals one of the first industries to close in Miami-Dade. Unlike restaurants, malls, massage studios, barbershops, hotels, gyms, casinos and tattoo parlors, scooter rentals remain banned in Miami-Dade.

“Miami was one of our best performing markets,” said Perelmuter, an Aventura resident and Lyft’s operations manager for the area. The warehouse used to be be bustling with vans unloading dead scooters needing charges and loading powered ones ready

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Cities after COVID & GM’s Electric Vehicle Push

Laveta Brigham

Welcome to the Capital Note, a newsletter about finance and economics. On the menu today: work from home, GM’s investment in Nikola, and a look at the Vegas-Wall Street pipeline.

Cities in the Post-COVID Era

With Labor Day now past, it will be interesting to see whether there will be a mass return to the office (at least here in New York City, wandering around Midtown late last week, things didn’t — whatever the Daily Mail might claim — look post-apocalyptic, but it was still more than a little forlorn).

Writing for the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal, Mark Mills takes a look at the debate over working from home — a concept he broadens out to working from anywhere (WFA), and, I think, gives some comfort to those of us still living in the city.

Mills starts by examining some of the survey data used as evidence that

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Workers Reveal Disney Is Covering Up Its COVID Cases

Laveta Brigham

Matt Stroshane/Walt Disney World Resort via Getty Images
Matt Stroshane/Walt Disney World Resort via Getty Images

In early July, the Walt Disney Company reopened parts of two amusement parks: Disney World near Orlando, Florida, and Disneyland in Anaheim, California. The former reopened to house the tightly controlled 13-week experiment known as the NBA Bubble, in which staff, players, coaches, and personnel adhered to strict social distancing guidelines and isolation requirements, paired with regular on-site testing. The latter welcomed back its workers with less grandeur, opening up a sprawling outdoor shopping district called Downtown Disney, with a select staff of several hundred. 

Though they reopened within days of each other, the two parks worked with wildly different resources. Unlike the Bubble, the Downtown Disney district had no on-site testing. In a letter to the unions in June, Disney Labor Relations Director Bill Pace called testing “not viable” and prone to “false negatives,” in spite of the fact that it

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Nervous about seeing ‘Tenet’ during COVID? These moviegoers are first in line

Laveta Brigham

John David Washington in "Tenet." <span class="copyright">(Warner Bros.)</span>
John David Washington in “Tenet.” (Warner Bros.)

As the pandemic continues, plenty of moviegoers remain nervous about returning to the cinema. Not Pat Egan.

As soon as his local AMC opened Aug. 20, the 31-year-old Philadelphia radio producer grabbed his mask and bottle of hand sanitizer and went out for a 3 p.m. showing of “Ghostbusters.” Since then, he’s seen Christopher Nolan’s 2010 hit “Inception” and the South Korean horror film “Peninsula.” On Monday, he attended a press screening of Nolan’s latest mind-bender, “Tenet.”

Braving indoor theaters for four movies in two weeks may seem to betray a devil-may-care attitude toward the COVID-19 era. But Egan said he’s felt safe each time, thanks in part to the lack of other patrons.

“They were doing a good job of keeping people pretty far apart,” said Egan, who works for sports-talk station 97.5 FM (“The Fanatic”). “When we saw ‘Peninsula,’ it was

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