COVID19

How COVID-19 Made Acting Lessons Accessible to Me

Young woman wearing headphones taking online class.
Young woman wearing headphones taking online class.

As an actress with cerebral palsy, I have two needs: Acting lessons for training and transportation to take me there. I have recently moved to Frederick, MD. Back when I lived in Burtonsville, I was much closer to Washington, D.C., the place to study acting in this heart of America. But it doesn’t mean Uber trips were cheap. I began my training at The Theatre Lab last summer. My “Intro to Acting” class was an early Saturday morning class. I could take an $18 Uber ride to Silver Spring and take an easy Metro ride there. Rinse and repeat for the ride home. One of the various reasons was why I took a morning class is because Uber rides are much cheaper in the morning than the evening.

As most acting studios go, most of The Theatre Lab’s classes take place at night

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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Colleges are racing to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO — When students arrive at the University of California San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine if they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cell phone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, it will set in motion a huge response system that includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be

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Critics say federal agency is where workplace COVID-19 complaints go to die

The complaints have poured in from Florida work sites since the start of the pandemic.

From a Miami prison where staff allegedly weren’t provided proper protective equipment. From a whistleblower at a Panhandle plasma donation center where employees who were visibly sick and awaiting COVID-19 test results allegedly still came into work. From a hospital where nurses treating a patient allegedly weren’t told the patient was COVID-positive.

The complaints go to the federal Occupational Health and Safety Administration, which dutifully maintains a list of the alleged infractions. But it’s unclear how much action is being taken.

OSHA, charged with enforcing health and safety in the American workplace, has received more than 6,000 complaints nationwide about unsafe work conditions related to COVID-19. And yet, on June 9, Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia told lawmakers that OSHA, which his department oversees, had issued just one citation related to the coronavirus — to a

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Sign a COVID-19 Waiver FAQ

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Even as coronavirus cases climb across the nation, many businesses are trying to reopen, and some are doing so with a new twist—asking customers to sign documents waiving their right to sue in the event that they contract COVID-19 on the premises.

At the same time, some companies are asking employees to sign COVID-19 waivers, hoping to limit their liability if workers catch the virus at work. 

Should you sign such a waiver? Can your employer force you to sign one in order to return to work? And what rights are you giving up if you do?

We put those questions to a range of legal experts to create the following guidelines and recommendations.

First, a few important preliminary points. 

One: The legal and safety implications of COVID-19 waivers are somewhat distinct for these two groups—consumers and workers—and should

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When is the extra $600 federal unemployment cutoff? Your COVID-19 money questions, answered

It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

The additional $600 in weekly jobless benefits provided by the federal government is officially set to end July 31. But states will pay it only through the week ending July 25 or July 26, a significant blow to unemployed workers counting on that money to bolster state benefits that average just $370 a week.

“The (Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation) $600 can be paid for weeks ending no later than the week ending prior to Friday, July 31, 2020,” the U.S. Department of Labor said in a statement. “For … Read More

Duke plans mass COVID-19 testing and mix of in-person and online classes this fall

Duke University is planning to bring students, faculty and staff back to campus in August with new safety precautions, including mass COVID-19 testing, adjusted classroom layouts and revised housing options in dorms and hotels.

The school also announced the plan for its student-athletes to return to campus, beginning with football players on July 12.

The news comes as state health officials say they are concerned about the recent increase in COVID-19 cases among younger adults.

“While the trends we see today are concerning,” Duke president Vince Price said in a statement, “we believe that the many safety precautions we are putting in place will allow us to responsibly continue along the path towards opening Duke’s fall 2020 semester on campus in August. We ask all members of the Duke community — students, parents, faculty and staff — to recognize and accept that we may need to change our plans based

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COVID-19 cases are rising in West Sacramento. Mayor explains what’s behind the surge

Few communities are immune to the recent surge in COVID-19 cases, it seems. That’s of little consolation to Mayor Christopher Cabaldon of West Sacramento, where infection rates have risen dramatically in the past two weeks.

“The situation is very problematic,” Cabaldon said Tuesday. “It’s no comfort that it’s the case across the region and across the state.”

A month ago, West Sacramento was seeing one new case a day. Some days the city recorded no new cases at all, according to data compiled by Yolo County’s Health and Human Services Agency. The record for one day was six, reported in early April.

In the past few days, however, daily infections have risen significantly. The city had either 10 or 11 new cases reported on four separate days last week.

Cabaldon said many of the new cases are originating in private family gatherings — a belief echoed by Gov. Gavin Newsom

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COVID-19 Has Been A Blessing To QAnon. It’s A Warning Of What’s To Come.

Hours after the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak a global pandemic on March 11, Fox News primetime host Sean Hannity pondered the news on his radio show. It “may be true,” he mused to his audience of millions, that “coronavirus fearmongering by the Deep State will go down in history as one of the biggest frauds to manipulate economies, suppress dissent and push mandated medicines.”

Once again, far-right conspiracy theories had broken loose from internet dens and shaped mainstream conservative media coverage. Hannity, a close confidant to President Donald Trump, was parroting a known promoter of QAnon, the online fringe movement that claims a “deep state” cabal of Satanist elites is running an international child sex trafficking ring, among an ever-expanding repertoire of other falsehoods.

The COVID-19 emergency has turbocharged QAnon’s ability to spread tactical disinformation and attract new followers. As the movement seizes on public anxiety

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Is It Safe To Let People Use Your Bathroom During The COVID-19 Pandemic?

There are many steps you can take to make the process of letting someone use your bathroom safer. (Photo: Niccoló Pontigia / EyeEm via Getty Images)
There are many steps you can take to make the process of letting someone use your bathroom safer. (Photo: Niccoló Pontigia / EyeEm via Getty Images)

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered our social lives in many ways. Perhaps one of the most notable changes is the rise of the physically distanced backyard hangout.

We’ve all seen the images of small groups of people sitting outside and having a drink. Although any sort of gathering does carry some risk for spreading the coronavirus, we know it’s much less easily transmitted outside, where there’s more space and more natural airflow. 

Still, there’s one issue that seems unavoidable: What happens when someone has to use the bathroom?

“The real risk is from person-to-person interaction, so letting someone use your bathroom would not pose a major risk of disease exposure,” said Brian Labus, a professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas’ School of

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