facing

Facing a wave of evictions, California is about to make thousands of kids homeless

Ian Jameson, left, organized a gathering of tenant rights activists at El Monte City Hall to demand that the City Council pass a moratorium barring all evictions during the pandemic. <span class="copyright">(Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Ian Jameson, left, organized a gathering of tenant rights activists at El Monte City Hall to demand that the City Council pass a moratorium barring all evictions during the pandemic. (Jason Armond / Los Angeles Times)

Things weren’t great before COVID-19, but at least only about 570 families, hungry, broke and on the brink of homelessness, needed help from the volunteers at St. Joseph Center in Los Angeles.

Today, that number is about 860.

A month from now, it could be in the thousands — or even more.

California is rapidly approaching what has been dubbed the “eviction cliff,” or the point where true protection from being evicted during the pandemic will fall away, at least for a short time. If that happens, as many as 1 million families across the state — some 365,000 in Los Angeles County alone — could find themselves at risk of being forced out

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10 Steps to Take When You’re Facing a Forced Retirement

You spend decades of your life working toward the goal of retiring someday. There’s a ton of guesswork involved about when it will happen, how much you’ll need each year and even how long you’re expecting to live.

But when retirement happens sooner than you anticipated — due to a layoff, health issue or some other life event — your decades of retirement planning gets thrown off course.

Suddenly, your time to save is over. Now you have to make less money last even longer than you’d imagined.

10 Steps to Take When You’re Forced to Retire Early

Whether you’ve been forced to retire early due to circumstances beyond your control or you’re preparing for a worst-case scenario, know you still have options for a financially sound retirement. Follow these steps to help you adjust your plans.

1. Find Affordable Health Coverage

When you have to retire early, you’re hit

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American teachers are facing ‘a perfect storm’ of crises amid the coronavirus pandemic

The compounding stresses of the coronavirus pandemic, the sudden transition to remote learning, and the politicization of schools reopening are burning out teachers.

“I was on the verge of leaving,” an art teacher from Connecticut, who teaches kindergarten through fifth grade but did not want to be identified out of fear of professional retaliation, told Yahoo Finance. “The reason why I stayed truthfully was because of my loan payments.”

According to a survey by Horace Mann of 2,490 educators in the U.S. in June, 34% of them are considering leaving the profession due to the financial stress they’re feeling. 

“It’s like a perfect storm happening right now because the federal government hasn’t passed any legislation to give states any money,” Tish Jennings, an associate professor at the University of Virginia who studies how stress affects teachers, told Yahoo Finance. “ And so when they don’t have enough money in the

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Biden facing pressure within party as running mate search enters final phase

By Joseph Ax and Trevor Hunnicutt

(Reuters) – Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden is facing pressure from contending groups inside his party as he prepares to interview a shortlist of women for the most important hire of his political career: his running mate.

Biden, who committed to choosing a woman for the job he held for eight years under President Barack Obama, said this week he expected the background vetting process to conclude around July 24. He would then interview each finalist before making a decision, expected by early August.

The selection of the vice presidential candidate has taken on outsize importance this year, reflecting the desperation to defeat Republican President Donald Trump among Democrats, who have agonized over which candidate would give Biden the biggest boost in the Nov. 3 election.

Biden leads in national and battleground-state opinion polls as voters fault Trump for his handling of the coronavirus

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We’re Facing a Mental Health Crisis in Healthcare Workers, the Majority of Whom Are Women

More than 130,000 Americans have died from COVID-19, a novel strain of coronavirus, and cases continue to surge in communities across the country. But for front-line medical workers, particularly those working in emergency rooms and treating COVID-19 patients, the fight has only just begun.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that at least 515 healthcare workers have died so far after contracting COVID-19 – with 34 percent of cases still unreported – a larger, potentially even more deadly crisis is looming. For doctors, nurses, hospital cleaners, and other staff members on the front lines – nearly 80 percent of whom are women, according to the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics – it’s their mental health that has been devastated, and this country is beyond ill-equipped to help them repair it.

“Trauma does not have a timeline, so we will be seeing the ramifications from this

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America’s international students are facing deportation. This is a disaster

<span>Photograph: Charles Krupa/AP</span>
Photograph: Charles Krupa/AP

If you are an international student planning to study in the United States this fall and your classes are online, you might want to prepare yourself. Unlike students who are American citizens, you won’t get to resume your classes. You are looking at losing your legal status in the US. You are looking at getting deported.

On Monday, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice) issued new rules to all educational institutions in the country. The new rules mandate that international students on F-1 and M-1 visas who are currently in their home countries will be denied entry into the US if their universities go online in the fall semester – as Harvard University, for instance, plans to do. Students who are already inside the US whose universities go online will also lose their immigration status unless they can immediately secure admission at another program with in-person instruction.

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‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More