Fall

College students face financial strains, health concerns from pandemic ahead of fall semester

Brittany Goddard’s final semester at Howard University isn’t the dream ending she imagined in Washington, D.C. 

When the coronavirus pandemic shut down the U.S. economy in March, she scrambled to pack up her belongings since she had to be out of her dorm room within 48 hours. At the same time, she lost her part-time job at a catering company and still hasn’t received unemployment after filing for jobless benefits in April. 

She was set to study abroad in Barcelona over the summer, but those plans were upended due to the pandemic. And with just weeks to go before the fall semester begins, she’s worried about how she’ll pay the remaining balance of her tuition and fees – roughly $9,000 – since her financial aid won’t cover it at the private school.

“It’s heartbreaking. I’m a low-income student. I can’t afford tuition,” Goddard, 20, says, who’s created a GoFundMe page … Read More

Half of College Students Plan to Return to Campus for Fall Semester

Students enrolling in college for the 2020-21 school year are facing a very different set of circumstances than ever before. With the coronavirus pandemic still surging across the U.S., many colleges have delayed reopening for the new semester and instead, are sticking with online learning. Other schools plan to hold in-person classes, but with social distancing and other safety measures in place.

But are students willing to head back to campus? According to the findings of the latest Student Loan Hero survey, 1 in 3 students do feel ready to return. But an even greater number (about 45%) said they would prefer to take classes online. And the majority of students want a tuition discount for this new model of remote learning.

Here’s what we found from our survey of 1,050 full-time college students.

Key findings Just over a third — 34% — of college students will return to campus

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Mid-American Conference cancels fall football due to virus

The Mid-American Conference on Saturday became the first league at college football’s highest level to cancel its fall season because of the pandemic.

”I’m heartbroken we are in this place,” MAC Commissioner Jon Steinbrecher said.

With the MAC’s 12 schools facing a significant financial burden by trying to maintain costly coronavirus protocols, and the uncertainty that campuses can be opened safely, the conference’s university presidents made the decision to cancel all fall sports – including soccer and volleyball – and explore making them up in the spring season.

Though postponing could also prove costly without revenue generated by football media rights deals and ticket sales.

”It would be naive to say that you don’t give thought and consideration to what the financial ramifications or any decision are, but this was a health and well-being decision first and foremost,” Steinbrecher said. ”As we sit here today we don’t know what this

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15 things you need from HP if you’re taking classes online this fall

Here are some of the best back-to-school products you can get at HP.
Here are some of the best back-to-school products you can get at HP.

—Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Many schools around the U.S. are bringing students back to school digitally this fall, and with transitioning to an online classroom comes a slew of possible technical issues. The most you can do is be prepared for any eventuality, and having the right tools can help you be better prepared for online learning. We’ve got recommendations for the best laptop you can buy, the best laptop for students, and even the best laptop under $1,000. And there’s one thing all three lists have in common—HP sits at the top.

Seeing HP at the top of our laptop roundups isn’t surprising. The company boasts an impressive line of high-performing and affordable laptops that are perfect for students, whether they’re in

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More Twin Cities School Districts Make Decisions For Fall: LIST

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL METRO, MN — It’s been more than a week since Gov. Tim Walz and the Minnesota Department of Health released parameters they want schools to meet before fully reopening, and more schools have made decisions about what this fall will look like for students and staff.

Minnesota’s “back to school” season is going to be unlike any other year, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

The recommended model of education — distance learning, hybrid, or in-person — depends on how many coronavirus cases are reported in the county.

However, the ultimate decision of how to reopen school this fall is being left up to the school districts themselves.

Several school districts in the Twin Cities metro have already announced their “education model” decision for this fall, while others are planning to do so later this month:

Note: All school districts in Minnesota are required to offer an online-only

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From child care stipends to flexible schedules, companies aim to help parents juggle remote learning and work again this fall

When the state issued its stay-at-home order in March, Gina LaMonica, 39, a partner with Chicago law firm Perkins Coie, had just returned from a work trip.

Overnight, the COVID-19 pandemic turned her Park Ridge home into an office and a school as she and her husband juggled their careers and the care of their two young daughters. Worlds collided, work shifted to all hours of the day and night, and somehow, they made it to the summer, exhausted and fully employed.

“It was very difficult,” LaMonica said. “Those were long days.”

For working parents like LaMonica, the pending start of the school year, which brings the anxiety of new teachers, schedules and courses under even the best of circumstances, is looming as a major source of stress.

A growing list of companies are pushing office reopenings to 2021 and many school districts, including Chicago Public Schools, are nixing even

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As Maryland public schools go online this fall, private and parochial schools ready to welcome students on campus

As Maryland’s public schools announced their decisions to keep their doors closed at least for the beginning of the school year, private schools have done just the reverse — arguing they have the ability to give families the in-person classes they want while keeping students safe.

Because of their small size, some experts say private and Catholic schools, are better able to make quick adjustments to their curriculum and often have more physical space to spread students out. But financial forces and teachers unions are also shaping public and private school decisions.

“The driver has been meeting the needs of our students,” said Donna Hargens, the superintendent of Catholic Schools in the Baltimore Archdiocese. “The interpersonal interaction is essential to the learning process and we know that some of our students struggled with remote learning especially those with learning needs.”

Public schools, meanwhile, often have to cope with tightly-packed classrooms

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Sacramento fall sports shutdowns hit parents, coaches

As the debate on whether to open California schools during the coronavirus pandemic continues, many Sacramento area fall sports have been postponed or canceled, affecting children and families.

The cancellations have caused uncertainty for many households, especially those with young children. If parents have to work and are unable to get a caretaker for their kids or put them in an activity, it can cause stress.

Richard Graham is the 14U coach for the Roseville Junior Tigers, a travel football team.

In addition to coaching, he has three sons of his own. His 14-year-old plays football, while his 7- and 8-year-olds play soccer. He also sponsors and coaches four other children who do not have father figures.

Graham notes that in wealthier areas, parents are more likely to be in the picture and can afford to do more with their kids. “Not everyone has that,” he said.

“It’s not just

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Here’s How to Make Schools Safer for Reopening in the Fall

(Bloomberg Opinion) — During the weekend, the New York Times highlighted some of the comments it has received in reaction to articles about reopening schools. They were not a cause for optimism.

“Despite all my love for my students, I don’t really want to die for them or anyone else. Neither does my partner, who is living with cancer,” a teacher from Minneapolis wrote.

“Of course we need to reopen schools,” said a teacher from Maine, who then asked whether school nurses would be responsible for all the coronavirus testing that would be needed and where the schools would get enough personal protective equipment. “How many teachers receive combat pay while being forced into mortal heroics?” he added.

A parent from Massachusetts: “Does my daughter want to go back to the classroom? Yes. Do I prefer that she does? Yes. Do I want to risk her health in order for

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Colleges are increasingly going online for fall 2020 semester as COVID-19 cases rise

Call it coronavirus déjà vu. After planning ways to reopen campuses this fall, colleges are increasingly changing their minds, dramatically increasing online offerings or canceling in-person classes outright.  

This sudden shift will be familiar to students whose spring plans were interrupted by the rapid spread of the coronavirus. Now, COVID-19 cases in much of the country are much higher than in the spring, and rising in many places. 

In many cases, the colleges had released plans for socially distant in-person classes only a few weeks ago, hoping to beat the coronavirus.

“Instead,” said Robert Kelchen, a professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, “the virus beat us.”

Just as in the spring, students have been left scrambling to adjust their class schedules and living arrangements, faced with paying expensive tuition for online classes and rent for an apartment they may not need. Digital classes are still unappealing to many,

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