Puerto Rico residents say they answered 2020 census. The government says otherwise — over and over again.

Laveta Brigham

Barrio Obrero Marina.
Barrio Obrero Marina.

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO — In Barrio Obrero Marina, a working class neighborhood of San Juan, the U.S. Census Bureau said that fewer than one in 10 households had answered the 2020 census by mid-August. Community leader Carmen Febres Alméstica set out to see if the government was right.

Wearing a face mask under the midday sun, Febres Alméstica, who chairs a local residents’ organization, began on Argentina Street.

A woman named Raquel Pérez, her dog barking non-stop behind her small entrance gate, greeted Febres Alméstica from a balcony. Pérez said her daughter filled out a census form for her. She assured Febres Alméstica that several of her neighbors also answered the census and that she received two visits from census workers after completing the process.

On 14th Street, a man sweeping in front of a bar closed by the pandemic said he filed a census form

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Meet the exec behind Microsoft’s $10 billion JEDI Pentagon cloud contract win and its efforts to woo industries like healthcare, finance, and government

Laveta Brigham

<br>
Toni Townes-Whitley, Microsoft's president of US regulated industries. <p class="copyright">Microsoft</p>
Toni Townes-Whitley, Microsoft’s president of US regulated industries.

Microsoft wants to position itself as the top cloud provider for governments, schools, financial firms, and healthcare companies and one key executive is at the center of it all of those ambitions: Toni Townes-Whitley.

Townes-Whitley, the company’s president of US regulated industries who joined Microsoft in 2015 and took on the role in 2018, has already made her mark on Microsoft’s $15 billion public-sector business when she helped the company land a $10 billion cloud-computing contract with the Pentagon in late 2019. 

Then, the importance of her role expanded unexpectedly this year as the coronavirus crisis has forced Microsoft customers to adopt cloud-computing technologies at lightning speed.

She’s steering Microsoft’s government and regulated industries business at an unprecedented time, as the company courts massive customers and shifts its strategy to target industries in her purview — such as healthcare — with

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The UK government is paying influencers to promote the NHS test and trace service

Laveta Brigham

Social media influencers are often seen as lazy freelancers who make a living being paid to pretend they like products. But these “celebrities’” are more than just marketing vehicles. If used properly, they can be effective agents of positive social change.

Yet the UK government has taken a bold step by working with influencers to try to stop the spread of coronavirus. It has paid several social media influencers and reality TV stars to promote the NHS test and trace service – the system used when someone tests positive for COVID-19 to work out who else might be at risk after coming in contact with them. The service relies on local public health teams contacting those that may be potentially infected to ask them to self-isolate and test for the virus. However, to date, the service is failing to deliver. This is for many reasons, one of which is

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Flu shot will be essential this fall, Federal government extends CERB, offers new COVID-19 benefits

Laveta Brigham

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety.

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

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Federal government extends CERB, offers new COVID-19 benefits for Canadians

Laveta Brigham

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 4,600 active cases of COVID-19 in Canada (with more than 121,000 diagnoses so far) and 9,000 deaths. Nearly 90 per cent of the country’s reported COVID-19 cases have recovered.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

August 20

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Britain faces up to prospect of mass unemployment as government support winds

Laveta Brigham

Getty
Getty

“I literally don’t know what I would do.” says freelance chef Ryan Fisher as he considers the prospect trying to live off £343 per month universal credit – again.

The amount is £200 less than he pays each month to support his nine-year-old daughter, never mind his rent, food, gas, electricity, car insurance.

“I don’t know how I’ll cover all my bills. It’s just not enough to live on.”

He knows this from bitter experience because he’s been there before, when the government forcibly shut down his industry in March and work, which had been plentiful, dried up. Like millions of others, Fisher wasn’t entitled to any of the coronavirus support schemes.

After three months of debts piling up, calls from credit card companies and an emergency £500 grant from charity Turn2Us he found some short-term work at Porters, an upper-class eatery in Southampton.

For now, as the sun

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How a mysterious company tied to ‘Titanic’ villain landed government coronavirus contracts

Laveta Brigham

Billy Zane, the Hollywood actor best known as Rose’s villainous fiance in “Titanic,” was the celebrity pitchman for a venture capital firm that specializes in flashy global networking events.

It’s the same company that taxpayers paid $2.4 million for ventilators and protective garb this year as the firm set its sights on the global coronavirus pandemic. And the U.S. government appears to have grossly overpaid for t.

But trying to track down information about the company and its product exposes the tangled web the government has created for itself by relying on a growing number of middlemen, brokers and newcomers to secure emergency supplies.

Parkpine Inc. is a Delaware company registered to a single-family home in Los Angeles, with a mailing address at an apartment in Chinatown, and tied to a business with “offices” in Silicon Valley and Hollywood that really are just UPS Store mailboxes.

Founder and managing partner

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The Subreddit Helping Unemployed People Abandoned by Government

Laveta Brigham

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Like more than 52 million Americans, Ian DeMenna has filed for unemployment insurance during the COVID-19 pandemic. Like many of those people, he is still waiting for his first check. 

And like more than 30,000 others, he’s turned to r/unemployment for advice—or at least some perspective.

Since 2009, users on the r/unemployment subreddit, a channel on the online forum network Reddit, have helped each other navigate the intricacies of national and state-level unemployment insurance systems. But when COVID-19 lockdowns swept the country in March, shuttering businesses and forcing workers off payrolls, the subreddit saw an unprecedented wave of activity: up from approximately 10,000 pageviews per month to nearly 8 million in April alone.

Faced with missing payments and busy phone lines at notoriously inept unemployment offices, users of r/unemployment are trying to patch the holes in an overburdened American safety net. 

The community has

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12 legit ways people are getting free money from the government

Laveta Brigham

Well yeah, there are scammers who try to steal your personal information and your money with promises of free pots of gold from the government. But there also are many legitimate ways the government can provide you with some cash with no strings attached.

You might get some money if you’re buying your first home, scraping by after a layoff, preparing to go to college, needing some help with your monthly bills — or if you’re just absent-minded and left behind a savings accountsomewhere.

Take a look at these 12 completely legit ways you can get free money from the government.

Do you love getting a tax refund? If that’s a yes, then many people aren’t as enthusiastic about getting money back from the IRS as you are, because $1 billion or more in tax refunds go unclaimed every year.

Americans have three years to file a tax return and … Read More

Raising taxes would endanger economic recovery, Labour tells government

Laveta Brigham

Parliament Live
Parliament Live

Raising taxes would be “dangerous” and make it harder for Britain’s economy to recover from the coronavirus pandemic, Labour’s shadow chancellor has said.

Anneliese Dodds on Wednesday warned that Labour’s support would not be guaranteed if the government went ahead with a rise in capital gains tax, warning against “last-minute decisions around tax without appropriate scrutiny and without proper planning”.

Laying out Labour’s preferred economic strategy for the pandemic she told a seminar that the government should prioritise a return to growth, and that tax rises would be counterproductive reducing demand.

“There’s been some suggestion, before today’s news around capital gains tax, that there could be a kind of generalised income tax, VAT, or national insurance rise and/or cuts to public spending,” she told the online meeting organised by the Institute for Government.

“I think that would be really quite a dangerous move at a time when the

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