How to manage your mental health during lockdown

Laveta Brigham

The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)
The National Domestic Abuse helpline has seen a 25 per cent increase in calls since lockdown began (Getty)

On 23 March prime minister Boris Johnson implemented a nationwide UK lockdown, which saw people confined to their homes.

Although the restrictions have eased since then, many people will have spent weeks at home – and are still unable to meet friends and family.

A long period of isolation may well have been a necessary measure to protect public health against Covid-19 but it has been acknowledged that it could also have a detrimental impact on people’s mental health.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) released a mental health guide for people who are self-isolating saying: “This time of crisis is generating stress in the population.”

So what should you do if your mental health is suffering during self-isolation; are there ways to ensure you safeguard your emotional and mental wellbeing during a

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Revenge porn cases rocketed over lockdown. Here are 5 ways to stay safe when sending intimate images online.

Laveta Brigham

A woman on her laptop appears to be stressed during the coronavirus pandemic on May 30, 2020 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The woman pictured is not associated with the story. <p class="copyright">Robin Utrecht/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images</p>
A woman on her laptop appears to be stressed during the coronavirus pandemic on May 30, 2020 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The woman pictured is not associated with the story.
  • As coronavirus measures force people to stay home and social distance, more people are sending explicit images of themselves to their partners.

  • At the same time, image-based abuse or so-called “revenge porn” is at an all-time high. The UK-based Revenge Porn Helpline reports a 22% increase in cases over the last months.

  • Insider spoke to a digital privacy advocate to find different ways to stay safe when sending private content to someone online.

 

Nothing is wrong with an adult sharing private images consensually.

In fact, 43% of women and 27% of men in the UK have sent a private or sexual image, according to a recent report published by Refuge. Now, as coronavirus measures

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These 30 Companies Struck Gold During Lockdown

Laveta Brigham

The coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdowns have had devastating financial effects on numerous businesses and sectors. According to data collected by Yelp, roughly 180,000 businesses were closed by April and nearly 100,000 reported in August that they will never reopen. Restaurants, bars and nightlife venues have been hit the hardest, and retail and beauty businesses have also suffered major economic losses, with many permanently closing their doors.

And it’s not just small businesses that are suffering. A number of major companies have filed for bankruptcy since the beginning of the pandemic, including J. Crew, Gold’s Gym, Neiman Marcus, JCPenney, Pier 1 Imports, Hertz, GNC and California Pizza Kitchen. Although stay-at-home orders have been lifted in most states, the negative financial effects of the lockdown will be long term for many companies.

On the flip side, several companies have been thriving and actually saw an increase in revenues and profits during

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How to be financially ready for the next COVID-19 lockdown

Laveta Brigham

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 has hit 200,000. And, a chilling forecast from the University of Washington predicts the number could more than double or even triple by January as people spend more time indoors and tire of social distancing and other recommended measures.

Other countries are imposing new lockdowns as coronavirus case numbers explode, and a new Newsweek poll finds a majority of Americans would support a national lockdown to stop the spread.

The earlier lockdowns in the U.S. led to layoffs and furloughs, and even a new series of smaller, more localized ones could spell trouble for workers still feeling drained after round one.

But you have time to prepare if Americans are asked to hunker down again. Here are nine things you can do to protect your finances ahead of a second lockdown wave.

1. Keep on saving

As the first wave of the pandemic swept

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A third of Brits will be ‘worse off’ after lockdown

Laveta Brigham

Nearly half of Brits are worried about their as finances support disappears and they're left with debt. (Gareth Fuller/PA Archive/PA Images)
Nearly half of Brits are worried about their as finances support disappears and they’re left with debt. (Gareth Fuller/PA Archive/PA Images)

A third of Brits will be financially “worse off” as the UK comes out of its COVID-19 lockdown, research suggests.

With the government’s furlough scheme set to end on 31 October and other forms of financial support also disappearing, one in three Brits told SimpleUsability the lockdown period has had a negative long-term impact on their finances.

According to the market researcher’s survey of 1,072 people, nearly three quarters (74%) have been furloughed, while over a fifth (22%) have relieved on government grants, such as the self-employment government support scheme.

Meanwhile, 6% have relied on government loans, and 8% have received other forms of financial support, such as a mortgage holiday or universal credit.

READ MORE: Parents set to save £11m a week on energy bills as kids return

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Domestic abuse workers reveal the trauma of trying to help victims during lockdown

Laveta Brigham

  <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Shutterstock</span></span>
Shutterstock

It became clear, very early on in the coronavirus pandemic, that lockdown would put domestic abuse victims and survivors at increased risk. But the pandemic has also taken its toll on the people who help them. I spoke to people on the front line to find out how they were coping.

Over the past few months I have been working on a film based around more than 20 interviews with people working in domestic abuse services in the UK as well as people working for charities, parliamentarians, NHS professionals and members of the police.

In July 2020, Labour MP Jess Phillips told me about how she spoke to a small organisation in Liverpool that had just four support workers dealing with more than 750 domestic abuse cases, some of which were very high risk. And indeed, the people I spoke to emphasised how difficult it has been to adapt,

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9 ways to prepare for the next COVID-19 lockdown

Laveta Brigham

9 ways to prepare for the next COVID-19 lockdown
9 ways to prepare for the next COVID-19 lockdown

After giving up spring break and summer barbecues, cooped-up Americans are looking forward to the day when things go back to normal. But COVID-19 isn’t like a natural disaster that strikes once, then fades away.

Several states have paused or walked back their plans to reopen, as new hot spots emerge and the number of active cases remains high.

Now health experts are warning that a second round of lockdowns may be necessary as the fall flu season begins, classes resume and cool weather drives people into cramped indoor spaces.

Even a series of smaller, more localized lockdowns could spell trouble for Americans’ livelihoods, especially for those workers still feeling drained after round one.

But you still have time to prepare. Here are nine things you can do to protect your finances ahead of a second wave.

1. Keep saving

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Big tech and lockdown essentials soar

Laveta Brigham

As the novel coronavirus pandemic reshapes American life, some companies have found business booming in the new normal, even as the rest of the economy recedes.

could close for good during the pandemic. Meanwhile, some of the larger companies have actually seen new gains amid the pandemic.” data-reactid=”13″It has been a bleak year for many businesses in the U.S., and experts warn that up to a third of all American small businesses could close for good during the pandemic. Meanwhile, some of the larger companies have actually seen new gains amid the pandemic.

stock market rally that has left a number of economists scratching their heads, experts say.” data-reactid=”14″This divide, which some have described as a “K-shaped recovery,” has been fueled in part by government relief actions and publicly-traded companies benefitting from a stock market rally that has left a number of economists scratching their heads,

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Tesco’s 16,000 jobs drive to reward lockdown temps

Laveta Brigham

Tesco will create 16,000 new permanent jobs after lockdown led to “exceptional growth” in its online business.

The new posts will include 10,000 staff to pick customer orders from shelves and 3,000 delivery drivers.

The recruitment drive reflects the shift to online shopping, which was accelerated by lockdown.

Tesco said it expected many of the roles to go to staff who joined them on a temporary basis at the start of the pandemic.

Supermarkets scrambled to meet a surge in demand for online deliveries while the UK was in lockdown.

Tesco said online customer numbers had risen from around 600,000 at the start of the pandemic, to nearly 1.5 million.

Before the pandemic, around 9% of Tesco’s sales were online. Now, online sales amount to 16% of sales, and are expected to be worth over £5.5bn this year, the company said.

Online grocery orders now make up 16% of Tesco’s

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Lockdown budgeting exploited by fraudsters

Laveta Brigham

Fraudsters have been intercepting people’s attempts to make their money go further during lockdown, with investment scams on the increase.

Fraud attempts in general were up 66% in the first half of the year compared with the previous six months, Barclays said.

The bank also reported an unprecedented spike in investment scams, up 49% in July compared with June.

Many people used time at home during lockdown to organise their finances.

Barclays said that many people had been researching online for a lucrative return on their investments. Savvy fraudsters have enticed them with offers that are too good to be true.

“Fraudsters have undoubtedly taken advantage of the nation’s uncertainty during the pandemic, in what is just another moment in the historical evolution of scams,” said Jim Winters, head of fraud at Barclays.

“The immediacy of our lives, even during lockdown, has allowed scammers to harness the constantly changing news

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