Don’t Claim Social Security Benefits Until You Can Answer These 3 Questions

Laveta Brigham

If you’re thinking of claiming your Social Security benefits, you may want to take a moment to make certain you’re really ready to act. Your claiming choice can be hard to undo, and it affects the amount of money you’ll receive for the rest of your life. To ensure you don’t make a decision now that you’ll regret later, ask yourself these three key questions. 

1. How much money will I get?

First and most important, you need to know how much income Social Security will actually provide if you claim your benefits now. The amount you’ll receive will depend on your age when you start benefits, as well as the income earned over the course of your career.

You can use the Social Security Administration’s online calculators to estimate the amount of your benefits or sign in to your online account and get a personalized estimate based on your

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Nevadans will decide these 5 questions in November

Laveta Brigham

These are the five ballot questions that Nevada voters will decide on the November ballot. (There is no Question 5, in order to keep question numbers consistent between the 2018 and 2020 elections.)

Each voter will receive a sample ballot supplement that will contain descriptions of each ballot question and arguments for and against them. You can also see that information online.

Question 1: Board of Regents

– The ballot language: Shall the Nevada Constitution be amended to remove provisions governing the election and duties of the Board of Regents and its control and management of the State University and require the Legislature to provide by law for the State University’s governance, control, and management and the reasonable protection of individual academic freedom at Nevada’s public higher education institutions; and revise the administration of certain federal land grand proceeds dedicated for the benefit of certain departments of the State University?

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Trump Deflects Questions About Taxes, but First Debate Has a New Issue

Laveta Brigham

President Donald Trump during an event at the White House in Washington, Sept. 23, 2020. (Oliver Contreras/The New York Times)
President Donald Trump during an event at the White House in Washington, Sept. 23, 2020. (Oliver Contreras/The New York Times)

WASHINGTON — The disclosure that President Donald Trump paid little or no federal income taxes for years, including while in the White House, convulsed the presidential campaign on Monday with only five weeks to go and immediately scrambled the equation and stakes of the first debate to be held on Tuesday night.

While Trump tried to deflect the news about his taxes, and his Republican allies generally kept their silence, Democrats pounced and former Vice President Joe Biden, the party’s presidential candidate, posted a video noting that the president paid less in income taxes than everyday Americans like teachers, firefighters and nurses.

The report in The New York Times, published online on Sunday evening and in print on Monday, revealed that Trump paid no federal income taxes for 11 of

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Betsy DeVos vows to make standardized tests great again: 4 questions answered

Laveta Brigham

Betsy DeVos
Betsy DeVos

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos Getty Images/Saul Loeb/Salon

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced on Sept. 3 that the government intended to enforce federal rules that require all states to administer standardized tests at K-12 public schools during the 2020-2021 school year. Nicholas Tampio, a Fordham University political scientist who researches education policy, puts this declaration into context.

1. What did DeVos say?

Since the passage of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, U.S. public school students have had to take federally mandated standardized tests every year.

Students got a break in the spring of 2020 when DeVos announced that states could apply for waivers due to the pandemic. “Neither students nor teachers,” she explained, “need to be focused on high-stakes tests during this difficult time.”

In September, DeVos reaffirmed her commitment to federally mandated testing. “It is now our expectation,” DeVos wrote in a letter to chief

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Who’s hosting? What’s going to win? Will this be a disaster? All your burning questions about this year’s socially-distant Emmys answered

Laveta Brigham

Executive producers Ian Stewart and Reginald Hudlin are overseeing the 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards. (Photo: ABC/Todd Wawrychuk)
Executive producers Ian Stewart and Reginald Hudlin are overseeing the 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards. (Photo: ABC/Todd Wawrychuk)

Between coronavirus-caused production delays and a glut of new streaming platforms, the future of television is rife with uncertainty right now. But here’s one thing we do know for sure: The (awards) show will go on. The 72nd Primetime Emmy Awards are scheduled to be handed out on Sept. 20, honoring pre-pandemic series like The Crown, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, Schitt’s Creek, Succession and Watchmen.

But don’t expect to see the stars of all those shows in the same room. This year’s ceremony will be entirely remote, with the eventual winners accepting their statues from their homes. An all-virtual Emmys is a first for television, and you can bet that other awards shows — including the Golden Globes, the Grammys and the Oscars — will be watching closely should

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Where’s My Second Stimulus Check? 32 Answers to Your COVID-19 Money Questions

Laveta Brigham

The coronavirus pandemic has led to widespread job loss and financial uncertainty — even for those who are still employed — due to market volatility and a global economy that’s been crushed by closures and lockdowns. With so much upheaval, many Americans are left struggling to figure out their best financial moves. From losing a job to retiring and life in between, here are the answers to some of the most pressing coronavirus money questions.

Last updated: Sept. 18, 2020

Will There Ever Be a Second Stimulus Bill?

Congress has thus far been unable to agree on exactly what a second round of relief funding would entail. Democrats previously proposed a $3 trillion bill and then suggested $2 trillion in relief, while Republicans proposed a $300 billion “skinny” relief bill. Some experts, including Jordan Weissmann, Slate’s senior business and economic correspondent, believe a second relief bill — and the second

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Steve Bannon is busted, educators face schism over schools, and talk of reopening revives questions

Laveta Brigham

It’s Monday, Aug. 24, and even the unexpected Florida story sometimes has us flummoxed.

Take the tale of two Florida men snagged, along with President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager and ideological point man, Steve Bannon. The three were arrested last week for fleecing hundreds of thousands of donors in an online crowdfunding campaign set up to privately finance construction of Trump’s border wall.

Some details you just can’t make up: Bannon, who was an early adviser to the president’s immigration strategy, was arrested on a yacht belonging to the Chinese billionaire Guo Wengui, a Communist Party dissident accused of working as a double agent for China’s government. Wengui is also a Mar-a-Lago member.

Others arrested were Brian Kolfage, of Miramar Beach in the Panhandle, who ran the “We Build the Wall” group and is alleged to have pocketed more than $350,000 to fund a lavish lifestyle, Andrew M. Badolato,

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The five most common tech support questions in America answered

Laveta Brigham

When our gadgets work, they’re nothing short of miraculous. They keep us informed, connected and entertained and have become so integral to our lives we often break into a cold sweat at the mere thought of going a day without them. 

When our personal electronics don’t work, our reactions can range from panic and frustration to true anger. Eight out of 10 Americans experience some type of tech frustration every single day, according to a study by global technology support company Asurion. It’s even worse now that our devices provide such a critical lifeline with work, school, family and friends during the coronavirus pandemic.

“We’ve seen a giant surge of IT-related questions,” says Gina King, senior tech category moderator at consumer question-and-answer site JustAnswer.com. “As states start to reopen or even reclose, people are getting desperate for simple, affordable, on-demand IT support at home.”

Making video meetings more fun: Social

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Some questions (and answers) about the Microsoft-TikTok deal

Laveta Brigham

trending newsletter banner
trending newsletter banner

Samantha Lee/Business Insider

Hello and welcome to Trending, Business Insider’s weekly look at the world of tech. I’m Matt Weinberger, deputy tech editor out of our San Francisco bureau, filling in for Alexei Oreskovic while he’s on vacation. If you want to get Trending in your inbox every Wednesday, just click here.

The clock goes tick-tock for TikTok

President Donald Trump and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
President Donald Trump and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella

REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Hello, and welcome to Trending, the Business Insider tech newsletter. As you may have already noticed, I’m not Alexei Oreskovic, your usual host — I’m Matt Weinberger, deputy tech editor out of our San Francisco bureau, filling in for Alexei while he takes some well-deserved time off. 

In my day job, I oversee our enterprise tech coverage, which encompasses cloud computing, artificial intelligence, open source software, and productivity (shameless plug: you can read all about it on Hyperscale, my

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Coronavirus: Money questions to ask your partner in a crisis

Laveta Brigham

Aaron Clarke is a certified financial planner and wealth advisor at Halpern Financial.

Money can often be a complicated topic with your partner in normal times, but the pandemic has only increased that financial stress for many couples. Even in the best of times, if there is a misalignment of what each person finds important and the couple can’t talk about these differences, it is bound to be a pain point.

Here are a few helpful ways to navigate challenging financial times with your spouse or partner — and maybe even improve your long-term financial picture at the same time.

A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)
A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)

Even beyond the traditional “are you a saver or a

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