Reopen

Schools Can’t Reopen Safely Without A Lot More Money. Congress Is Running Out Of Time.

WASHINGTON ― In a matter of weeks, millions of children will head back to school in the middle of a pandemic, leaving millions more parents filled with anxiety about risking their child’s health ― not to mention school staff ― to get an education.

Public schools cannot safely reopen without a massive infusion of emergency funding from Congress, which is already dangerously late to this. Think of all the things a single school needs: Hand sanitizers and disinfectant wipes for classrooms. No-touch thermometers. Regular deep cleanings, which means hiring more custodial staff. Ensuring that every school has at least one full-time nurse (25% of schools have no nurse at all). Someone on every school bus to screen kids’ temperatures before boarding. Gloves and masks for staff. Masks for students who don’t bring one from home. Resuming before- and after-school child care programs with new cleaning protocols.

That doesn’t even factor

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How Should Colleges Reopen? There’s No Easy Answer

(Bloomberg Opinion) — How parents and students feel about the fast-approaching specter of college reopenings this fall has been debated — perhaps exhaustively — in the thick of the Covid-19 pandemic. Can we do it safely? Should we send them back at all? Will young adults wear masks and abide by social-distancing guidelines? To get a better sense of the other side of the equation, we asked Bloomberg Opinion contributors who are also educators for their views on getting back in the classroom, whether physical or virtual.

Andrea Gabor, Baruch College

I mostly teach journalism to undergraduates at Baruch College, part of the City University of New York, in lower Manhattan. Most classes are taught in 14- and 16-story buildings. Elevator lines are long. A street below is closed to traffic, creating a small common space outdoors that’s often crowded with students.

Most of our 18,000-plus students commute via bus

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‘Panicked’ Teachers Prep Wills, Goodbye Letters Before Their Schools Reopen: ‘I’m Scared as Hell’

Many school districts have announced they won’t hold in-person classes at the beginning of the school year, while others are pushing forward with plans to reopen — and educators, especially those whose underlying medical conditions put them at increased risk of dying from COVID-19, tell PEOPLE they are fearing the worst.

Terri Crothers loves her job as an art instructor, but when her middle school district said teachers must return for in-person classes next month, she was so terrified of getting sick, and maybe even dying, she immediately contacted an attorney and started writing goodbye letters to her family.

She joins a growing list of anxious school teachers who are rushing to lawyers and estate planners to draw up new wills as they face the prospect of going back to their buildings amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“I’m scared as hell about going back into the classroom,” Crothers, 57, of Gallipolis,

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As Trump pressures schools to reopen, California’s 2 largest school districts say they’re going to start online only in the fall

President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.
President Trump is seen outside the White House on July 11, 2020.

Joshua Roberts/Getty

  • The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems said they’ll be starting the fall semester off online in a joint statement. 

  • The announcement comes after President Donald Trump said he’d pressure states to reopen in-person classes in the fall. 

  • The two districts have a combined total of 700,000 students, according to NPR.

  • On Monday, public health officials in Los Angeles County announced 2,593 new cases of COVID-19 and 13 new deaths.

  • Other counties, like Orange County, California, voted on Monday to reopen schools without measures requiring masks or increased social distancing.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Los Angeles and San Diego unified school systems announced that they’ll be going online only at the start of the fall semester, according to a joint statement.

“One fact is clear: those countries that have managed

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Trump’s demand that schools fully reopen spurned by big districts

President Donald Trump has spent the past two weeks demanding — often in all caps on Twitter — that American schools reopen this fall.

But America’s biggest school systems are rejecting the president across the country, with one city and county after another opting for virtual education or just a few days a week in school. And the president has little power to do anything about it.

The Los Angeles and San Diego school districts announced Monday they will start the upcoming school year with full distance learning. New York City schools will offer a mix of in-person classes and online learning. In suburban D.C., Maryland’s largest district is proposing to start the year with virtual learning. Other districts are considering just two or three days a week in the classroom, with kids continuing to learn from home the rest of the time.

Florida’s Miami-Dade County Public Schools — touted

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LAUSD To Keep Campuses Closed, Despite Trump’s Push To Reopen

VENICE, CA — Amid spiking coronavirus cases, Los Angeles Unified School District campuses will remain closed when classes resume next month, Superintendent Austin Beutner said Monday, defying President Donald Trump’s demand that students return to in-person instruction.

“While the new school year will begin in August, it will not start with students at school facilities,” Beutner said. “The health and safety of all in the school community is not something we can compromise.”

Citing Los Angeles-area coronavirus testing rates, which climbed to a seven-day average of 10% positive last week, Beutner said the virus — which is often asymptotic — could cause schools to become Petri dishes. He called it a public health imperative to keep schools closed.

“Reopening schools will significantly increase interactions between children and adults from different families,” he said. “In one of our high schools, for example, the almost 2,900 students and staff have frequent contact

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Push to Reopen U.S. Schools; New York Cases Steady: Virus Update

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said “the rule should be that kids go back to school this fall,” despite rising cases around the country. New York reported 677 new cases, in line with daily rises in the last week, and five deaths.

South Africa may reintroduce tighter regulations on the movement of people and curb sales of alcohol as coronavirus infections soar, the Sunday Times reported. Hungary is also restricting travel after spikes in neighboring countries. Infections in Germany increased by 377.

Thailand plans to start human trials for a locally developed, potential Covid-19 vaccine as early as September, making it among the first done outside high-income countries, after encouraging results in monkeys and mice.

Global Tracker: Cases top 12.7 million; deaths surpass 565,000Aversion to mask-wearing holds back U.S. economyU.K. set to tighten rules on wearing face masksWall Street forges a new relationship to data in coronavirus ageConflicting visions emerge … Read More

‘Big Mess’ Looms if Schools Don’t Get Billions to Reopen Safely

An empty classroom at Marietta High School in Marietta, Ga., where the district plans to spend $200,000 on desk partitions, July 7, 2020. (Audra Melton/The New York Times)
An empty classroom at Marietta High School in Marietta, Ga., where the district plans to spend $200,000 on desk partitions, July 7, 2020. (Audra Melton/The New York Times)

Bus monitors to screen students for symptoms in Marietta, Georgia: $640,000. Protective gear and classroom cleaning equipment for a small district in rural Michigan: $100,000. Disinfecting school buildings and hiring extra nurses and educators in San Diego: $90 million.

As the White House, the nation’s pediatricians and many worn-down, economically strapped parents push for school doors to swing open this fall, local education officials say they are being crushed by the costs of getting students and teachers back in classrooms safely.

President Donald Trump threatened this week to cut off federal funding to districts that do not reopen, though he controls only a sliver of money for schools. But administrators say they are already struggling to cover the head-spinning logistical and financial

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U.S. Schools Must Reopen. Are You Listening, New York?

(Bloomberg Opinion) — Online schooling has failed. American schools need to reopen in the fall.

It has now become obvious that the steady diet of online instruction put in place for the coronavirus pandemic not only has hurt kids academically and increased absenteeism, but has contributed to anxiety and depression and probably even aggravated health problems such as obesity.

“All policy considerations for the coming school year should start with a goal of having students physically present in school,” the American Academy of Pediatrics said in a June report.

A few states are starting to tackle the challenge of balancing the proven damage inflicted by inadequate internet technology and the deeper shortcomings of digital learning against the uncertain risks of Covid-19 infection. California, New Jersey, Alabama and Louisiana are among several states that have published detailed guidelines for enabling at least some in-person instruction. Other states, notably New York, have

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Boris needs to reopen gyms and spas for the health of the nation

Spa mask
Spa mask

Last weekend, the light at the end of the lockdown tunnel shone slightly brighter as the Prime Minister allowed more businesses in England to reopen in a Covid-secure way. Saturday, July 4 – dubbed “Super Saturday” – was the Independence Day the country had been waiting for: a taste of liberty after varying degrees of lockdown. A list that included effective ‘air corridors’ had been published, enabling summer holidays abroad, social distancing was reduced to one metre-plus, pubs poured pints and hairdressers fashioned the latest post-corona barnets.

Major sections of the hospitality and leisure industries reopened in what was the biggest return to freedom since the country went into full-scale lockdown on March 23. For many hotels across England this was excellent news, until the PM’s address on June 23 when he said: “‘Close proximity’ venues such as nightclubs, soft-play areas, indoor gyms, swimming pools, water parks, bowling

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