How to make the most of online school with young children

Laveta Brigham

Another day in Zoom school, another meltdown and another reminder of what parents already know: Online school is especially challenging for younger students. There’s a reason children from kindergarten through third grade spent much of their pre-pandemic school days moving around and learning through play, not sitting still and staring at at a screen.

Many school districts are prioritizing younger elementary school students for reopenings, as studies show that younger children may be less vulnerable to the coronavirus.

But what if you’re in a school district that’s not reopening anytime soon? What if your child is immunocompromised? Or what if you are reluctant to return to in-person learning in the middle of a pandemic when there are so many “what ifs”?

Then you have to make the most of distance learning.

Many tips for how to best manage distance learning — including creating a designated space for school, maintaining

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Here’s How Harvard Business School Plans to Advance Racial Equality

Laveta Brigham

In an effort to promote racial equality, Harvard Business School said it would boost its enrollment of Black students in future classes, hire a chief diversity officer and recruit more Black faculty and staff. The school plans to build more issues of race and diversity into its case-study method of teaching and make conversations about race a higher priority in its curriculum, it said last week.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
1. The school recently acknowledged past missteps involving race.

In June, following the national outcry stemming from George Floyd’s death while in police custody, Nitin Nohria, dean of the school, wrote a letter that said past efforts to recruit Black students to Harvard were insufficient. “I apologize that we have not fought racism as effectively as we could have,” he wrote.

2. The number of Black M.B.A. students at the school has stagnated.

For three decades the number of Black students on

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Amid COVID-19 and online school, thousands of students haven’t shown up

Laveta Brigham

Before life went sideways in March, Jennifer Ludtke and her daughters were deeply rooted in the public schools in Las Vegas.

Ludtke was a principal of a charter high school and had worked in the Clark County School District, and her daughters took advanced classes at a district middle school.

This year, after a lot of research about COVID-19 and schooling options and after the district announced it was starting virtually, Ludtke withdrew the girls and enrolled them in a state college that offers online classes. They’re earning both college and high school credit in English and math. (Because the girls are 12 and 13, the college administrators asked to interview them first – then offered them a grant toward tuition.) 

Ludtke resigned from her principal role and stepped back to teaching, which leaves her time to home-school her daughters in their other necessary subjects, such as social studies and

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A hacker published thousands of students’ grades and private information after a Nevada school district refused to pay ransom

Laveta Brigham

<p class="copyright">Motortion/Getty Images</p>
  • A hacker published grades and personal information of thousands of Las Vegas students after school district officials refused to pay a ransom in exchange for the information.

  • The leaked information included students’ names, social security numbers, addresses, and some financial information, and were published on an online hacker forum this week, a cybersecurity analyst told Business Insider.

  • Las Vegas’ Clark County School District announced earlier this month that some of its files were compromised by a hacker using ransomware and that law enforcement was investigating.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Last month, Las Vegas’ largest public school district announced that a hacker compromised some of its files using ransomware and was holding the files hostage while demanding a ransom payment.

Now, a hacker has published files containing students’ grades and personal information after school district officials refused to pay the ransom.

Brett Callow, a threat analyst

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Amid COVID and online school, thousands of students haven’t shown up

Laveta Brigham

Before life went sideways in March, Jennifer Ludtke and her daughters were deeply rooted in the public schools in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Ludtke was a principal of a charter high school and had previously worked in the Clark County School District, and her daughters took advanced classes at a district middle school.

But this year, after a lot of research about COVID-19 and schooling options, and after the district announced it was starting virtually, Ludtke withdrew the girls and enrolled them in a state college that offers online classes. They’re earning both college and high school credit in English and math. (Because the girls are only 12 and 13, the college administrators asked to interview them first — then offered them a grant toward tuition.) 

Ludtke herself resigned from her principal role and stepped back to teaching, which leaves her time to homeschool her daughters in their other necessary subjects,

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The online business school transforming sex workers into entrepreneurs

Laveta Brigham

MelRose Michaels teaches some of the many courses on CentroU. <p class="copyright">Fan Centro</p>
MelRose Michaels teaches some of the many courses on CentroU.
  • A new online university is educating sex workers about how to make it in the porn industry.

  • CentroU is a free online business school that teaches adult performers everything ranging from branding and marketing, home production, accounting, and navigating censorship. 

  • The coronavirus pandemic has changed the porn industry, with subscription-based platforms like OnlyFans and FanCentro have seen a significant jump in their “model sign-ups.”

  • Insider spoke to some students and teachers from CentroU, who have said that the courses have had a significant impact on their careers.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The porn industry is having a moment. 

Since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, traffic on porn websites has skyrocketed, adult performers are moving online, and subscription-based platforms like OnlyFans and FanCentro have seen a significant jump in their “model sign-ups.”

And it’s not just

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How the coronavirus is making school segregation worse

Laveta Brigham

In New York City, the nation’s largest school district, teachers and students of color say they don’t feel safe returning to school. Many of their schools lack windows that open, an ample supply of soap, masks or working ventilation systems — making it nearly impossible to navigate live classes in the middle of a pandemic.

An hour’s drive from the U.S. Capitol, about 27,000 Baltimore city school children — 1 in 3 students — do not have computers vital for virtual school. Thousands lack reliable wireless internet access.

And in Salinas, Calif., a photo of two elementary school girls huddled over their laptops and using free Wi-Fi outside a Taco Bell went viral last month, raising alarms in this majority Latino city and seizing the attention of public officials.

“This is California, home to Silicon Valley … but where the digital divide is as deep as ever,” tweeted Kevin de

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Some wary parents won’t vaccinate kids, setting up future school showdowns

Laveta Brigham

Michelle Vargas of Granite City, Illinois, has always vaccinated her 10-year-old daughter, Madison. They both typically get flu shots. But when a vaccine for the coronavirus eventually comes out, Vargas will not be giving it to her daughter — even if Madison’s school district requires it.

“There is no way in hell I would be playing politics with my daughter’s health and safety,” said Vargas, 36, an online fitness instructor. If the public school Madison attends and loves says the vaccine is mandatory, “we would find other options,” she said.

As pharmaceutical companies race to manufacture a Covid-19 vaccine, many people are wary of a shot that is working its way through the approval process at record speed during a highly politicized pandemic. While some professions could require employees to get the vaccine, experts say schools almost certainly will require students to — potentially setting the stage for a showdown

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New York City, the nation’s largest school system, is ‘in an impossible situation’ amid the coronavirus pandemic

Laveta Brigham

It’s been a rough week for the millions of children, parents, educators, and city officials involved in the reopening of New York City schools. 

After grappling with a shortage of teachers and buildings that are not ventilated well enough to deter transmission of coronavirus, the nation’s largest school district again delayed the start of in-person learning.

“The [New York] Department of Education has put P.S. 125 and many other schools in the city in an impossible situation,” Tamara Tucker, president of the parents association at P.S. 125 in Morningside Heights, which serves students from pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, told Yahoo Finance. “And I don’t want to penalize the schools for being hamstrung like that.” 

Students return for their first day of in-class schooling following the pandemic at New York City's Preschool of the Arts, having their temperatures checked before proceeding into the school, Tuesday, 15 September 2020. (PHOTO: B.A. Van Sise/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Students return for their first day of in-class schooling following the pandemic at New York City’s Preschool of the Arts, having their temperatures checked before proceeding into the school, Tuesday, 15 September 2020. (PHOTO: B.A. Van
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COVID-era virtual school supplies come with real spike in spending

Laveta Brigham

Back-to-school shopping is looking different for many families this year, thanks to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. With the 73 of the 100 largest U.S. school districts opting for remote learning this fall, backpacks are out – and Bluetooth headphones and Chromebooks are in.

That’s upending the budgets for many families and helps explain why back-to-school spending is set to break a record in 2020. Households with children in kindergarten through 12th grade will spend an average of almost $790 per family this year – a record as well as 13% higher than a year earlier, according to National Retail Federation, a trade group.

That jibes with the experiences of several families in Houston, the nation’s 9th largest school district, who shared their experiences with USA Today. When the city’s schools switched to online learning this spring due to the pandemic, many parents relied on makeshift arrangements, such as turning the

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