schools

Karavel Shoes Donates 3D Face Masks to Schools, Famous Footwear and Coach Make Big Donations + More

Aug. 11, 2020: Fashion-comfort retailer Karavel Shoes in Austin, Texas, is doing its part in the prevention of the spread of COVID-19. The family-owned business is in the process of printing 1,200 3D face shields to be donated to staff working in 15 schools located in low-income neighborhoods in Austin. The store also hired three high school students to work on the project. In addition, said Karavel owner Rick Ravel, the store will be selling additional masks to consumers with all proceeds from their sale donated to the Central Texas Food Bank.

Aug. 11, 2020: Famous Footwear has announced a new multiyear partnership with Ticket to Dream, which provides opportunities for foster children across the country. As part of the move, the brand is donating more than 12,000 new pairs of shoes this month to foster kids ahead of the back-to-school season and plans to provide supplies throughout the fall.

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Miami public schools return to online learning. What lessons were learned from spring?

Reopening Miami-Dade public schools began as a game of “ifs.”

If positive cases trend downward for 14 days. If testing for asymptomatic minors becomes widely available and expeditious. If at least 25% of a school’s student body opts to stay home, then the rest can go to the schoolhouse.

But as students, parents and teachers approach the first day of school — now Aug. 31 for Miami-Dade — there is finally more clarity on what school will look like. School will be remote and online until at least Oct. 5.

For at least a dozen districts around the state, including Miami-Dade, even the first day of school became another “if.” Start dates have been pushed back and some districts have conceded that virtual learning will take place for the first few weeks. Miami-Dade pushed its first day of school from Aug. 19 to Aug. 24 and then to Aug. 31

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Connecticut Schools In The Era Of Coronavirus: How Do They Rank?

CONNECTICUT — As parents across the state debate how or even whether their children will return to class in the fall, school superintendents are racking up accolades on how well their systems perform.

The latest trophies come from personal finance website WalletHub, which has named Connecticut’s public schools second best in the nation, just behind those of neighboring Massachusetts.

The Nutmeg State scored particularly well with some new criteria beyond the traditional metrics of academic excellence and standardized test scores. Connecticut ranked No. 1 in the category of COVID-19 response, for instance, and 20th in bullying incidence rate.

Money, of course, matters in school district performance, as it does in just about everything else. Research from the Albert Shankar Institute concluded that “On average, aggregate measures of per-pupil spending are positively associated with improved or higher student outcomes.” To really make a difference, that money needs to be spent on

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What Teachers Want Parents To Know As Schools Reopen

The coronavirus pandemic is raging, but schools are beginning to reopen across the country — many with terrifying results. 

HuffPost Parenting asked the teachers from our Facebook community what they want parents to know right now. Here’s what they had to say.

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“Educators will all tell you that we want to see our kids! We want group work, laughter in our hallways, pizza party incentives and everything that we once had in our schools. We also want to live, and we want our children to live

With the disruption of 2019-20’s school year, alongside immense loss-grief-trauma, our children will need time to make up any deficits they’ve encountered. This is doubly true for students of color and students with disabilities. … The plans that have been laid out thus far are vague and put us all at risk. It would be great to have had actual teachers

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Students among first to return offer lessons for reopening schools

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – Abigail Alexander shuffled through a stack of papers, trying to find instructions for logging in to her school-issued laptop. 

The 10-year-old chatted with her best friend, a fellow fifth grader, about who is in their classes this year at Head Middle Magnet Prep and what period they have a specific teacher.

Their conversation Tuesday sounded like a typical one between excited, anxious students on the first day at a new school – except this year is like no other.

Abigail was seated in the dining room of her North Nashville home while her two younger foster siblings played around the table. Her friend was on FaceTime, the phone propped up against the side of Abigail’s laptop.

The girls are among more than 86,000 Nashville students who started the school year virtually while their schools remained closed during the the coronavirus outbreak.

Two states away in Indiana, where 

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If Public Schools Are Closed, Should Private Schools Have to Follow?

St. Andrews Episcopal School, attended by Baron Trump, President Donald Trump's son, in Potomac, Md., on April 29, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)
St. Andrews Episcopal School, attended by Baron Trump, President Donald Trump’s son, in Potomac, Md., on April 29, 2020. (Samuel Corum/The New York Times)

Facing a resurgence of the coronavirus, public schools in the suburbs of the nation’s capital decided in recent weeks that more than 1 million children would start the school year from home. On Friday, officials in Maryland’s most populous county said that private schools, including some of the nation’s most elite, had to join them.

Gov. Larry Hogan, a Republican, abruptly overruled that directive this week, contending that Maryland’s private schools should be allowed to make their own reopening decisions. The governor staked out his position on the same day that a group of parents filed a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn the county’s order, saying it discriminated against private and religious schools.

The wrangling threw into sharp relief the challenges facing local health officials as

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Beirut explosion devastates ‘struggling’ heath system; Florida surpasses 500,000 cases; Chicago schools to go online

Another pharmaceutical giant announced a vaccine deal with the U.S. on Wednesday while Joe Biden and the rest of the Democratic celebs bid adieu to Milwaukee’s political convention before the coronation train ever rolled into town.

Johnson & Johnson said it has a $1 billion agreement to supply 100 million doses of its vaccine candidate to the U.S. government. Also Wednesday, Moderna said it expects to fully enroll 30,000 people for a trial of its vaccine candidate next month. And a day earlier, Novavax released promising results of an early trial. 

While the nation waits for a vaccine that could fully reopen schools and businesses, the University of Connecticut became the first top-level college program to cancel its football season. And cruise lines voluntarily extended their moratorium on sailings in U.S. waters another month, through October.

Here are some significant developments:

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has recorded more than

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The MLB Couldn’t Keep COVID-19 At Bay, But We Still Think Schools Stand A Chance?

As a huge baseball family, there’s been a hole in our lives since spring. Every March and April we all anxiously anticipate watching those first few pitches. As we see our favorite players run out onto the field on the big screen in our living room, my husband and I crack a beer, put out some snacks for us and the kids, and make it official. It’s baseball season.

But this year COVID-19 took professional sports away, like it took everything else away, and we’ve spent the last few months watching Netflix and Friends reruns and movies we love instead.

Until recently, when MLB announced they’re going to try and make it work, somehow, in 2020. But, as many expected, COVID-19 began to spread throughout the clubhouses, throughout the teams, infecting player after player. And now it’s looking grim and likely that this modified, shortened season will, for some teams,

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Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than a dozen

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Online school? Some parents want to hire tutors, start mini schools this year. Most can’t afford to.

CHICAGO – Millions of parents across the nation are facing difficult decisions about what to do with their kids this school year. But the pandemic affects every family differently, for reasons that range from their socioeconomic status to their health to the fields they work in.

Some parents are in a better position than others to ensure their children stay healthy and keep up with schoolwork, and researchers are raising questions about how the pandemic may continue to exacerbate existing educational inequalities.

“Kids who are disproportionately low-income are at highest risk for learning losses,” said Ariel Kalil, a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy. “When these gaps in learning open up, absent some really serious and sustained intervention, the kids won’t (catch up). That will result in less academic achievement, lower lifetime earnings and even lower productivity in adulthood.”

USA TODAY spoke with more than

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