How affiliate marketing may change in future as tech continues to advance

Laveta Brigham

Technology is ever-changing, and it is introducing some incredible advancements to our world. However, for every step forward that technology is making, affiliate marketing is taking a leap too. Here are some of the ways we could see affiliate marketing change in the future as digital technology and AI opportunities continue to expand.

Zero click marketing & visual search

There are a lot of advancements taking place with technology in this area of digital. With the advent of new technology, smarter phones and voice-activated searching now readily available this is impacting the way we look for and consume content and product information online.

It is thought that over 50% of Google searches are already zero-click searches, so affiliates and brand marketing strategies will need to be adjusted to meet these customer preferences. The same applies to the rise of visual searches. People are no longer just using keywords to find

Read More

Tech giants police their own online campaign ads as government disagrees on regulation

(InvestigateTV) – On websites and social media sites from Facebook to Instagram, political campaigns are trying to click with voters.

“Do President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump still have your support?”

“Did you see who Joe Biden picked for VP?”

“Who would Jesus vote for?”

All of those ads were designed to get potential voters to engage. Links route to surveys, campaign pages, blogs, online shops or email address collection and campaign donation sites.

Online ads are hugely beneficial to political campaigns. Instead of placing an ad in the biggest paper in a swing state or buying a slot during a primetime show with a possible demographic match to a campaign – strategists can drill down deeper.

These Facebook ads ran in September and attempt to get users to engage with campaigns. Often campaigns use interactive ads to get people to donate money, take surveys or provide contact information. Facebook has rules dictating interactive ads - including that anything that appears to work like a survey with clickable options actually works in the way it is portrayed.
These Facebook ads ran in September and attempt to get users to engage with campaigns. Often campaigns use interactive ads to get people to donate money, take surveys or provide contact
Read More

5 tech trends that will redefine finance in the next 5 years

Laveta Brigham

As one of the most ancient tenets of human societies, money and finance have been constantly evolving with advances in technology and science. As technology continues to take leaps and bounds and permeates every aspect of life, we can expect banking and finance to change.

So, how will technology transform financial services in the next few years? We asked experts to share their perspectives, and here are six trends we think are worth watching.

Natural language processing

The past decade has seen tremendous advances in natural language processing, the field of artificial intelligence that extracts meaning and context from spoken and written language. Natural Language Processing (NLP) provides an unprecedented opportunity to obtain value from Word and PDF documents, emails, chat logs, social media posts, and the vast amounts of unstructured data that constitute much of the web.

In the world of finance, we’re already seeing the

Read More

Children are spending more time online and in front of screens than ever before. Parents and experts reveal their best tips for managing kids’ tech use.

Laveta Brigham

Jessica Nelson, pictured above with her family, has set boundaries around screen time by having her kids help out with chores around the house. <p class="copyright">Jessica Nelson</p>
Jessica Nelson, pictured above with her family, has set boundaries around screen time by having her kids help out with chores around the house.
  • COVID-19 has seen an increase in children’s screen time, with many now clocking six hours per day according to one study — up 500% since before the pandemic.

  • Business Insider spoke to parents and experts about how to best manage kids’ screen time

  • Their advice varied from establishing offline routines to focusing more on what children are doing online rather than how much time they’re spending on devices.

  • The most important thing is to make time to do family activities together away from technology.

  • Sign up for our new parenting newsletter Insider Parenting here.

When the coronavirus pandemic forced schools and businesses to close in March, Jessica Nelson was tasked with taking care of three children on her own.

Like most people, Nelson had

Read More

Census field workers say faulty tech is hampering the count

Laveta Brigham

United States 2020 census form
United States 2020 census form

Getty/liveslow

As they scramble to complete the census count weeks earlier than originally planned, Census Bureau workers across the country say their task is being undermined by the technology that was supposed to revolutionize the national count. It’s the latest twist in a troubled count that former Census Bureau directors cautioned in a recent letter “will result in seriously incomplete enumerations in many areas across our country.” An undercount could have enormous repercussions, from representation in Congress to the allocation of hundreds of billions of dollars in government funding. 

The iPhone 8s that many of the more than 200,000 field workers were provided for inputting data don’t have the battery life to last an eight-hour shift, Census Bureau workers told Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting. They describe the phones’ tailor-made app, designed by a company with a poor track record with the Census

Read More

TikTok owner picks Oracle over Microsoft as US tech partner

Laveta Brigham

TikTok said in a statement Monday that its proposal to the Treasury Department should ‘resolve the Administration’s security concerns’

Oracle said Monday that the Chinese owner of TikTok has picked the U.S. company to be its “trusted technology provider,” beating out rival Microsoft in a deal that could help keep the popular video-sharing app running in the U.S.

Oracle spokeswoman Deborah Hellinger said she was confirming remarks made by U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who told CNBC on Monday that TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, submitted its proposal to the U.S. government for approval.

Read More: White TikTok star dragged for claiming Ashanti’s classic ‘Foolish’ was her ‘new song’

“We did get a proposal over the weekend that includes Oracle as the trusted technology partner with Oracle making many representations for national security issues,” Mnuchin said.

Mnuchin said there’s also a commitment to make TikTok’s global operations a U.S.-headquartered company

Read More

Why are there so few black tech entrepreneurs?

Laveta Brigham

“I think a lot of folks like myself never even get a chance, because folks don’t answer their phones, or listen to their idea, but put them in a box they shouldn’t be in,” says Zack Smith, the founder of Boston-based Jobble.

He’s talking about how hard it can be for black tech entrepreneurs to raise money.

But Mr Smith saw it as a challenge.

“It doesn’t matter what box they put me in to begin with, I’ll get out of that box and prove to them I’m bigger and better. I think this fuels me,” he says.

His firm is a US platform for jobs in the gig economy, offering work to those who want flexible hours.

‘Supportive’

According to a study of 9,874 US business founders by California-based social enterprise RateMyInvestor, only 1% of start-ups receiving venture capital were black.

But Mr Smith was fortunate to have New

Read More

Why there are so few black tech start-ups

Laveta Brigham

“I think a lot of folks like myself never even get a chance, because folks don’t answer their phones, or listen to their idea, but put them in a box they shouldn’t be in,” says Zack Smith, the founder of Boston-based Jobble.

He’s talking about how hard it can be for black tech entrepreneurs to raise money.

But Mr Smith saw it as a challenge.

“It doesn’t matter what box they put me in to begin with, I’ll get out of that box and prove to them I’m bigger and better. I think this fuels me,” he says.

His firm is a US platform for jobs in the gig economy, offering work to those who want flexible hours.

‘Supportive’

According to a study of 9,874 US business founders by California-based social enterprise RateMyInvestor, only 1% of start-ups receiving venture capital were black.

But Mr Smith was fortunate to have New

Read More

Phoenixville Moves Quickly To Get Tech Into Kids’ Hands

Laveta Brigham

PHOENIXVILLE, PA — Phoenixville Area School District has distributed almost 2,000 district-funded laptops, and over 250 hot spots are functioning in a response to help everyone participate in online instruction.

Phoenixville Area School District Board of Directors this week approved a professional services contract with T-Mobile and Comcast to provide internet services at low rates for district families who have not had internet at home.

Virtual instruction, in place because of the coronavirus pandemic, left some behind, and the Phoenixville Community Education Foundation partnered with the district to make sure kids could participate in live classes at home and access all instruction and materials.

Costs related to technology will be covered by the Phoenixville Community Education Foundation (PCEF), which has been raising money in recent weeks to pay for the internet access.

“PCEF is doing some incredible work in supporting the tech needs of our families,” said PASD school board

Read More

Tech firms given a year’s notice to reform to protect children online

Laveta Brigham

TELEMMGLPICT000236453024.jpeg
TELEMMGLPICT000236453024.jpeg

Tech firms have been put on a year’s notice to introduce reforms that will protect children from harmful content – or face multi-million pound fines.

Elizabeth Denham, the Information Commissioner, has told firms including Facebook, Google and Twitter they have a year to ensure they adhere to a new legally-enforced code that bars them from serving children any content that is “detrimental to their physical, or mental health or well being.”

The Government-backed code will be enforced by fines potentially worth billions of pounds and is designed to prevent a repeat of the case of Molly Russell, the 14-year-old who killed herself after viewing self-harm images on Instagram and other sites.

It will also require the companies to safeguard children’s privacy to prevent them being groomed by paedophiles, to curb “addictive” features like notifications that keep them online and to restrict the firms’ from using personal information for commercial

Read More