unemployment

Essential Benefits You Can Receive on Unemployment

The COVID-19 epidemic has taken a booming U.S. economy and ground it to a halt. Within just two weeks, 10 million Americans filed first-time claims for unemployment, dwarfing prior records and pulling the U.S. toward recession. While hopes remain high that the virus can be slowed or stopped and the economy can get back on track, millions of workers need assistance now. If you find yourself in this position, the recent $2 trillion CARES Act may provide some relief. Here’s a list of already-existing benefits that may help you if you find yourself unemployed, in addition to more benefits brought about by the CARES Act.

Last updated: April 12, 2020

1. Unemployment Checks

Unemployment insurance is a joint state-federal program that provides weekly checks to qualifying workers. You’ll be paid a percentage of your weekly income over the prior 52 weeks. Most states limit the duration of unemployment benefits to

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Unemployment money was a coronavirus lifeline. Scammers grabbed $900K in NC cases.

Federal authorities in Charlotte said Thursday they had seized $80,000 held in bank accounts that they say scammers used to steal unemployment benefits meant to help people survive the coronavirus pandemic.

It was the second such case U.S. Attorney Andrew Murray’s office announced this week. More than $48,000 was seized in that case, authorities said Tuesday.

Court documents say unknown scammers used personal information stolen from identity theft victims in North Carolina’s Western District to apply online for state and federal unemployment benefits, Murray and Reginald DeMatteis, special agent in charge of the Secret Service in Charlotte, said in Thursday’s announcement.

The fraudsters then directed bank account holders to make financial transactions with the money or transfer it to other bank accounts, often overseas. Many of the account holders, referred to in court documents as “money mules,” were involved in online romances with the scammers and didn’t know they were

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When is the extra $600 federal unemployment cutoff? Your COVID-19 money questions, answered

It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

The additional $600 in weekly jobless benefits provided by the federal government is officially set to end July 31. But states will pay it only through the week ending July 25 or July 26, a significant blow to unemployed workers counting on that money to bolster state benefits that average just $370 a week.

“The (Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation) $600 can be paid for weeks ending no later than the week ending prior to Friday, July 31, 2020,” the U.S. Department of Labor said in a statement. “For … Read More

Florida Has 4th Worst Unemployment Recovery In Country

ACROSS FLORIDA — As recent outbreaks of the coronavirus in states like Florida, Texas and Arizona cause a new wave of shutdowns, MoveOn.org is calling on Congress to extend coronavirus emergency unemployment funding through the end of the year.

The petition has been signed by more than one million people so far.

Without an extension, unemployment benefits are set to expire on July 31.

“Many people who are laid off due to COVID-19 won’t find work for a very long time, maybe never because some jobs lost today won’t be coming back,” reads the petition. “People will need time and resources to learn and develop a new skill. By ending the $600 per week additional unemployment assistance too soon, we will certainly be dooming people to tragic futures. This will have far-reaching ramifications. We need to look out for each other during these unprecedented times. Please let’s help each other

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‘It breaks your heart.’ California should audit embattled unemployment agency, lawmaker says

Citing relentless consumer anger over delays and confusion in dealing with the state’s unemployment agency, Assemblyman Jim Patterson Friday formally requested an audit of the state’s beleaguered Employment Development Department.

Among his requests: A close look at the agency’s decisions to award years of contracts for modernizing and maintaining the system to Deloitte Consulting LLC.

The Sacramento Bee reported Thursday that EDD has repeatedly used Deloitte to help build and maintain its IT systems for years, despite warnings from state watchdogs that the systems were often delayed and over budget.

Patterson, a Fresno Republican, listed his frustrations In a lengthy, detailed request that described his experiences with infuriated constituents upset with EDD.

“Every single day people are messaging me, saying, Jim, nobody’s returning my call. Or they denied my application for unknown reasons. It breaks your heart,” he told The Sacramento Bee, echoing what other lawmakers have found and readers

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$600 bonus unemployment benefits end soon. Here’s how to prepare

Another 1.5 million Americans filed jobless claims last week to receive unemployment benefits, and the payments are currently going to about 19.5 million people, the government reported Thursday.

A weekly benefit boost has made unemployment a little easier for those who lost their jobs to the coronavirus, but soon they’ll have to survive without the bonus money.

The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act — the CARES Act that also brought you those stimulus checks — provides an extra $600 per week of unemployment through July 31. Lawmakers haven’t committed to an extension.

Standard unemployment payouts vary from state to state, and depending on where you live you may have trouble making ends meet on regular benefits alone.

Here are nine things you can do to prepare to cope with a smaller weekly payout.

Pad your emergency fund while you still can

Vitalii Vodolazskyi / Shutterstock

While you

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1.48 million people filed for first-time unemployment last week, worse than predictions

Around 1.48 million people filed for initial unemployment benefits last week, the 14th consecutive week that states have processed over a million first-time applications — and a larger weekly figure than economist predictions of 1.35 million.

While the figures for the week ending June 20 are a far cry from the peak of 6.6 million in March, it is still an astonishing number, and a continuation of the grim ritual that has happened at 8:30 a.m. every Thursday since the pandemic hit, when the Department of Labor announces how many claims have been made for unemployment insurance.

The U.S. economy is showing some signs of improvement — in housing and online retail sales, for instance, but the labor market is still in rough shape.

As the downturn wears on, economists are paying closer attention to continuing claims. According to the latest release from the federal government, around 20 million are

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1.48m more Americans file for unemployment as pandemic takes toll

Another 1.48 million people filed for unemployment insurance across the US last week as the grim economic toll of the coronavirus pandemic continued and infection rates picked up in many states.

Claims for unemployment insurance have now fallen for 12 weeks in a row but remain historically high. About 47 million people have now filed for benefits in the last 14 weeks with 3 million claims made in the last two weeks. Last week’s figure was just 60,000 lower than the previous week.

The latest figure comes even as states across the country have begun reopening after relaxing quarantine measures. But surges in infection rates in states, including new record highs in states including Arizona, California and Texas, are likely to prove a further drag on the economic recovery.

Nicholas Juhle, head of economic research at Greenleaf Trust, said a backlog of claims may have been adding to the still

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‘I Have Nothing:’ The Story Of Wisconsin’s Unemployment Crisis

MILWAUKEE, WI — It was Wednesday morning, and DeiDra Blakley was on the floor of her Milwaukee apartment counting the loose change she saves in a jar.

Blakely has been out of work for more than 13 weeks, and despite applying for unemployment insurance benefits in Wisconsin, she has yet to receive a check. She’s fallen more than two months behind on her rent, and is afraid she might be evicted after the state’s 60-day moratorium on evictions expired last week.

She has a quarter-tank of gas left in her car, and she’s been spending the morning hunting for boxes at nearby gas stations, so she has something to pack her belongings in case she is evicted.

The change amounts to $16.03 — almost enough to fill the tank.

Blakely used to work in the Fire Keepers Club at the Potawatomi Hotel and Casino until she was furloughed. Her last

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Online scams due to COVID, protests, unemployment in 2020

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Online scams can come in many forms and via any kind of device. (Photo: Getty)

A worldwide pandemic, mass unemployment and nationwide protests over racial injustice — there are many important issues occupying our collective attention. Sadly, this kind of large-scale distraction is fertile ground for hackers.

“We have the COVID disaster combined with the economic disaster combined with the protests,” said Adam Levin, cyber security expert and founder of CyberScout, to Yahoo Life. ”We are now in the middle of what can be considered a perfect storm for scammers.”

Levin says that the current climate of our nation has set the stage for an online scam trifecta: motive, means, and opportunity.

“The motive for

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