Virus

Virus, Floyd death merge in brutal blow to Black well-being

Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately.

They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And they are especially prone to diabetes, hypertension and other chronic diseases that can be tricky to manage even in normal times.

Then came COVID-19 and George Floyd — one killing Black people in alarming numbers, the other shining a harsh light on systemic racism. In a matter of months and nearly 8 minutes, it became clear that institutions designed to ensure the two most important things in life — health and safety — had converged to turn against one segment of the population in stark, horrific ways.

It’s a brutal blow to Black people’s well-being and renewed calls for racial justice in all realms

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Virus Surges in Arizona, but the Rodeo Goes on

Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)
Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)

PHOENIX — As infections surged through Arizona’s desert landscape this week, word spread that the Round Valley Rodeo, a century-old tradition luring calf ropers, youth riders and big crowds to the mountain town of Springerville, might be called off. The fate of the Fourth of July parade in the nearby hamlet of Eagar seemed in doubt, too, as Gov. Doug Ducey prepared to issue new pandemic guidance.

But Ducey stopped short of ordering a halt to such events, and as of Friday, he had not required Arizonans to wear face coverings in public spaces, as Texas did Thursday. The rodeo and parade will march ahead Saturday as planned, even as infections in the state spiral.

Such is the way fiercely independent Arizona has handled the virus from the

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Mexican Retailers See Big Losses, Discounts in Virus Aftermath

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MEXICO CITY Mexican retailers face sales declines of up to 70 percent this year as COVID-19 continues to rip through Latin America’s second-largest economy with no signs of easing.

“We have started to reopen in phases, but there is still a lot of uncertainty,” said Marcela Muñoz, a retail analyst with Vector Casa de Bolsa brokerage, adding that leading department stores such as Liverpool or El Palacio de Hierro have been hit hard by the pandemic.

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“Department store sales declined 50 percent last month on a same-store basis and they had to stay closed in April and May,” said Muñoz. She added that May turnover recovered compared to April, when it fell 73 percent.

Sales are also expected to gradually increase this month as the government allowed some retailers to resume operations this week after three months of lockdowns.

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Nets’ Spencer Dinwiddie tests positive for virus

The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world:

Brooklyn Nets guard Spencer Dinwiddie says he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Dinwiddie told The Athletic he is experiencing symptoms and it is unclear if he can play when the NBA season resumes.

His absence would be a significant blow to the Nets. He has played well this season with Kyrie Irving out of the lineup because of injuries.

Dinwiddie says he tested negative for the virus multiple times after returning to New York and took part in a couple practices. But he has since tested positive and says he has a fever and chest soreness.

He is at least the fifth Nets player to test positive. The previous four were in March, with Kevin Durant saying he was among them.

Dinwiddie is averaging 20.6 points for the Nets, who have a half-game lead

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Dueling Trump-Biden events offer contrasting virus responses

LANCASTER, Pa. (AP) — As President Donald Trump visited a Wisconsin shipyard to emphasize job growth and reviving an economy hammered by the coronavirus, Joe Biden spent Thursday in Pennsylvania warning “there are no miracles coming” to help the nation beat back the still deadly pandemic.

“Amazingly, he hasn’t grasped the most basic fact of this crisis: To fix the economy we have to get control over the virus,” the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee said of Trump while speaking at a community center in Lancaster. “He’s like a child who can’t believe this has happened to him. His whining and self-pity. This pandemic didn’t happen to him. It happened to all of us.”

The pandemic has largely prevented the two presidential candidates from holding dueling appearances in pivotal battleground states. On Thursday, it gave them an opportunity to show off their contrasting styles on a virus outbreak that has killed

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Stocks make modest recovery despite virus worries

European stocks made modest gains Thursday, one day after a brutal selloff, but US indices struggled on continued worries about a resurgence of coronavirus and mounting job losses in the US.

Oil also recovered some of Wednesday’s five percent tumble on increasing infections stoking demand worries, just as the latest data showed a big jump in US stockpiles for a third week.

Asia extended losses after heavy overnight falls on Wall Street, amid holiday closures in Hong Kong and Shanghai.

There were hefty losses in New York and across Europe on Wednesday on heightened fears of a second wave of the deadly COVID-19 outbreak.

“Stock markets have edged up today after Wednesday’s falls, but there is still a lingering sense of caution over the signs of rising infection rates in the US,” said Chris Beauchamp, chief market analyst at online trading firm IG.

European markets held onto their gains until

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B.C.’s new virus models renew hope for Canadian travel, Atlantic Canada considers travel bubble

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 101,900 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,400 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 24

6:15 p.m. COVID-19 questions of the day

5:45 p.m.: B.C. moving into Phase 3 with the resumption of

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Bookshops fight back against virus and Amazon

Bookbugs and Dragon Tales owner Leanne Fridd has been running online storytelling sessions
Bookbugs and Dragon Tales owner Leanne Fridd has been running online storytelling sessions

Before lockdown, the number of independent bookshops in the UK rose for three years in a row. But the pandemic drove customers online – and shops had to get creative to survive.

Running an independent bookshop can be a challenge at the best of times, trying to compete with the might of Amazon and the supermarkets. In recent years, things had been looking up, however, with 890 on our high streets in 2019, up from 867 three years earlier.

They took a major hit during lockdown, but most have reopened (except in Scotland) in time for Independent Bookshop Week, which runs until Saturday. Many found new ways to reach readers while their doors were shut, but their long-term futures are still in the balance.

“As yet we have no idea how many retail casualties may result from

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Bookshops on the battle with virus and Amazon

Bookbugs and Dragon Tales owner Leanne Fridd has been running online storytelling sessions
Bookbugs and Dragon Tales owner Leanne Fridd has been running online storytelling sessions

Before lockdown, the number of independent bookshops in the UK rose for three years in a row. But the pandemic drove customers online – and shops had to get creative to survive.

Running an independent bookshop can be a challenge at the best of times, trying to compete with the might of Amazon and the supermarkets. In recent years, things had been looking up, however, with 890 on our high streets in 2019, up from 867 three years earlier.

They took a major hit during lockdown, but most have reopened (except in Scotland) in time for Independent Bookshop Week, which runs until Saturday. Many found new ways to reach readers while their doors were shut, but their long-term futures are still in the balance.

“As yet we have no idea how many retail casualties may result from

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Black Business Owners Are Hit Hardest by Virus

The coronavirus pandemic will shutter many small businesses. And early evidence shows it is disproportionately hurting black-owned small businesses.

More than 40% of black business owners reported they weren’t working in April, when businesses were feeling the worst of the pandemic’s economic consequences. Only 17% of white small-business owners said the same, according to an analysis of government data by Robert Fairlie of the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Many small businesses are struggling during the pandemic because they lack easy access to loans and cannot easily move their businesses online. Black-owned businesses tend to have fewer employees than other small businesses. They are also more likely to be in industries like restaurants or retail that lockdowns have hit especially hard, said Ken Harris, president of the National Business League, an organization founded by Booker T. Washington in 1900.

“Most lack the capacity, scale and technical assistance needed to survive

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